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Summary:

The conflicts between owners and workers in the early years of American industry often became violent. The bloody events of July 1892, which pitted two of the nation's most skillful businessmen-Andrew Carnegie and Henry C. Frick-against the workers in their Homestead steel mill, have become emblematic of the labor unrest of the period.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Treasure Valley Community College Library 331.8904 W5878h (Text) 32220000978037 Adult Non-Fiction Book None 11/22/2011 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 1931798885 (library binding)
  • ISBN: 9781931798884 (library binding)
  • Physical Description: 144 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: Greensboro, N.C. : Morgan Reynolds Pub., [2006]

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Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-141) and index.
Summary, etc.:
The conflicts between owners and workers in the early years of American industry often became violent. The bloody events of July 1892, which pitted two of the nation's most skillful businessmen-Andrew Carnegie and Henry C. Frick-against the workers in their Homestead steel mill, have become emblematic of the labor unrest of the period.
Carnegie and Frick were both visionary entrepreneurs. When they acquired the steel works at Homestead, they inherited a powerful labor union. The Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers, a part of the fledgling American Federation of Labor, had recently negotiated a strong contract. Carnegie and Frick were determined to force the union out, despite Carnegie's public statements of appreciation for the rights of the working man. As talks opened between labor and management, Carnegie fled to Great Britain and left Frick in charge. A few months of stalled negotiations and provocative moves on both sides led to a strike in the summer of 1892. Frick immediately called in Pinkerton guards. On July 6, a battle erupted between Pinkertons and striking workers, leaving several dead and forever changing the face of American labor.
Subject: Carnegie, Andrew, 1835-1919.
Carnegie Steel Company > History.
Homestead Strike, Homestead, Pa., 1892
Steel industry and trade > United States > History

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