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Available copies

  • 3 of 3 copies available at Sage Library System.

Current holds

0 current holds with 3 total copies.

Summary:

Wild Horse Annie was the nickname of Velma Bronn Johnston (1912-77), loved mustangs all her life. When she saw mustangs being rounded up and killed to make room for ranchers' livestock, she knew she had to speak up. In 1950, she began writing letters to local newspapers and politicians, defending the horses' right to roam free. Many people told Annie to hush up, but they couldn't stop her. She soon became a voice for mustangs throughout the state of Nevada, speaking on their behalf at town halls and meetings. But Annie was only one person, and she wanted to do more. So she got children to speak up, too, by having them write letters to Washington, D.C., officials to ask them to save the mustangs. Finally, with the help of her young "pencil brigade," Annie persuaded Congress to pass nationwide laws protecting wild horses and burros on public land nationwide. Readers will find inspiration in author Tracey Fern and artist Steven Salerno's portrait of an early animal-rights advocate, who spoke up for what she believed in, and empowered a generation of children to be a voice for the voiceless.--from book jacket.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Cook Memorial Library - La Grande JE Fern, T (Text) 35178001747966 Juvenile Easy Book Branch_Only_3months 04/11/2019 Available -
Fossil City Library J. 636.1 FER (Text) 37830000066172 Juvenile Non-Fiction Book None 05/06/2021 Available -
The Dalles Wasco County Library J B JOHNS (Text) 33892006455159 CHILDREN'S BIOGRAPHIES Book None 02/22/2019 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780374303068 (hardcover)
  • ISBN: 0374303061
  • Physical Description: 48 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
    print
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York, New York : Farrar Straus Giroux, 2019.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Summary, etc.: Wild Horse Annie was the nickname of Velma Bronn Johnston (1912-77), loved mustangs all her life. When she saw mustangs being rounded up and killed to make room for ranchers' livestock, she knew she had to speak up. In 1950, she began writing letters to local newspapers and politicians, defending the horses' right to roam free. Many people told Annie to hush up, but they couldn't stop her. She soon became a voice for mustangs throughout the state of Nevada, speaking on their behalf at town halls and meetings. But Annie was only one person, and she wanted to do more. So she got children to speak up, too, by having them write letters to Washington, D.C., officials to ask them to save the mustangs. Finally, with the help of her young "pencil brigade," Annie persuaded Congress to pass nationwide laws protecting wild horses and burros on public land nationwide. Readers will find inspiration in author Tracey Fern and artist Steven Salerno's portrait of an early animal-rights advocate, who spoke up for what she believed in, and empowered a generation of children to be a voice for the voiceless.--from book jacket.
Subject: Johnston, Annie Bronn Juvenile literature
Mustang Conservation Juvenile literature
Animal rights activists Nevada Juvenile literature
Nevada Juvenile literature
Summary: Wild Horse Annie was the nickname of Velma Bronn Johnston (1912-77), loved mustangs all her life. When she saw mustangs being rounded up and killed to make room for ranchers' livestock, she knew she had to speak up. In 1950, she began writing letters to local newspapers and politicians, defending the horses' right to roam free. Many people told Annie to hush up, but they couldn't stop her. She soon became a voice for mustangs throughout the state of Nevada, speaking on their behalf at town halls and meetings. But Annie was only one person, and she wanted to do more. So she got children to speak up, too, by having them write letters to Washington, D.C., officials to ask them to save the mustangs. Finally, with the help of her young "pencil brigade," Annie persuaded Congress to pass nationwide laws protecting wild horses and burros on public land nationwide. Readers will find inspiration in author Tracey Fern and artist Steven Salerno's portrait of an early animal-rights advocate, who spoke up for what she believed in, and empowered a generation of children to be a voice for the voiceless.--from book jacket.
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