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Tough Kids, Cool Counseling : User-Friendly Approaches with Challenging Youth. by Sommers-Flanagan, John.; Sommers-Flanagan, Rita.; Delgado-Romero, Edward A.;
Tough Kids, Cool Counseling : User-Friendly Approaches With Challenging Youth -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- About the Authors -- Part I: User-Friendly Foundations -- Chapter 1: Adventures in Child and Adolescent Counseling -- Adventures in Counseling Young Clients -- Who Are the "Challenging" Young Clients? -- Diagnostic Labeling -- Empirical Foundations -- Common Misperceptions and Pitfalls in Working With Young People -- The Been-There-Done-That Trap -- Inaccurate Assumptions of Similarity -- Your Own Childhood Emotional Pain Can Interfere With Objectivity -- The Urge to Parent (Rather Than Counsel) Young Clients -- Developmental Considerations -- The Role of Play -- Social Development -- Autonomy, Individuation, and Oppositionality -- Cognitive Competencies and Limitations -- Emotional Competencies and Limitations -- Initiative, Identity, and Independence -- Gender Issues and Cultural Diversity -- Gender Issues -- Cultural Diversity -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 2: Establishing Rapport, Gathering Information, and Informal Assessment -- Establishing Rapport -- Office Management and Personal Attire -- First Impressions -- Discussing Confi dentiality and Informed Consent -- Managing Referral Information: Acknowledging Reality -- Gathering Information -- Wishes and Goals -- Informal Assessment -- Discussing Assessment and Counseling Procedures -- User-Friendly Information-Gathering Procedures -- What's Good (Bad) About You? -- Draw-A-Person Interpretations -- Offering Rewards -- Inferring Attachment Issues -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 3: Resistance Busters: Quick Solutions and Long-Term Strategies -- Getting Your Buttons Pushed -- Siding With the Client's Affect -- Specific Resistance Styles and Specific Solutions -- Youth Who Externalize or Blame -- Youth Who Use Denial -- Youth Who Are Nonverbally Provocative.Youth Who Use Silence -- Youth Who Verbally Attack Their Counselor -- Youth Who Appear Apathetic -- Concluding Comments -- Part II: User-Friendly Strategies -- Chapter 4: Rapid Emotional Change Techniques: Teaching Young Clients Mood Management Skills -- Rapid Mood-Changing Techniques -- Food and Mood -- Three-Step, Push-Button Emotional Change Technique -- Passing Personal Notes -- The Hand-Pushing Game -- Arm Wrestling -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 5: Behavioral, Cognitive, and Interpersonal Change Strategies -- Never Underestimate the Power of Contingencies -- Defining Bribery -- Therapeutic Wagering -- Redefinitions and Reframing -- Brown-Nosing -- Risks of Honesty and Risks of Deception -- Escape From Weakness -- Termination as Motivation -- Aggression Control Shortcuts -- Interpersonal Change Strategies -- Teaching Strategic Skills to Adolescents -- Interpreting Interpersonal Relationship Patterns -- Interpersonal Simulations and Inverse Examples -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 6: Constructive and Communication-Based Change Strategies: Storytelling and Hypnotherapy -- Therapeutic Storytelling -- Indirect Storytelling -- Directive Storytelling -- Self-Initiated Storytelling -- Hypnotherapy -- The Wizard of Oz Hypnotherapy -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 7: Ecological Theory and Parent Education Strategies -- Ecological Considerations -- Two Great American Cultural Myths -- Family Therapy -- Approaches to Parent Education and Training -- When to Use Parent Education and Training -- Parent Education Content -- Inadequate or Ineffective Discipline -- Inadequate Parental Involvement/Supervision -- Parental Modeling and Indirect Messages -- Divorce Education -- Concluding Comments -- Part III: Special Topics in Treating Young Clients -- Chapter 8: Assessment and Management of Young Clients Who Are Suicidal -- Suicide Statistics.Suicide Assessment Issues -- When to Initiate a Suicide Assessment Interview -- A Constructive Critique of Suicide Assessment Procedures -- Evaluating Adolescent Suicide Risk and Protective Factors -- Predisposing Suicide Risk Factors -- Suicide Risk Factors Associated With Mental Status -- Triggering Factors -- Brief Suicide Interventions and Management Issues -- Alternatives to Suicide -- Decreasing Mental Constriction -- No-Suicide Agreements, Safety Contracts, and Treatment Planning -- Addressing Access to Lethal Methods -- Decreasing Social Isolation -- Professional Issues -- Referral Issues -- Consultation -- Documentation -- Decision Making -- Decision Making and Client Recommendations -- School Counseling Ethics -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 9: Medication Evaluations and Evaluating Medications -- Should Counselors Discuss Medication With Young Clients and Their Parents? -- Discussing Medication Treatment With Young Clients and Their Parents -- Case Example: Run, Don't Walk, to Dr. Smith's Office -- Focus on Client Concerns -- Inform Clients of Your Professional Limits and Biases -- Refer Clients Back to Their Physicians -- Provide General Medication Information (or Information on How to Obtain Information) -- Refer Clients for a Medical Second Opinion -- The Medical Model and Rationale for Medication Treatment -- Diagnostic Issues and Medication Effectiveness -- Diagnostic Problems in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry -- Medication Treatment for Youth With Major Depression -- Medication Treatment for Youth With Conduct Disorder -- Medication Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder -- Medication Treatment for Youth With Bipolar Disorder -- Medication Referral Guidelines -- Concluding Comments -- Chapter 10: Ethical Endings -- Counselor Emotional Reactions to Counseling and Termination With Difficult Clients.Fear, Anxiety, and Relief -- Disappointment/Sadness -- Anger/Resentment -- Ideal Counseling and Ideal Termination -- Less-Than-Optimal Termination Scenarios -- Termination Déjà Vu -- Counselor-Initiated Termination -- Parent- and Client-Initiated Termination -- Sudden Termination -- Is It Finally Over? -- References -- Index -- Technical Support -- End User License Agreement."This second edition is even richer than the first-and I've worn the cover and a few pages, front and back, off my first edition copy-in that it is up-to-date and written in the authors' heartfelt, unpretentious voice that makes this book as user-friendly as the approach they put forward." -Kurt L. Kraus, EdD Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania "The authors' emphasis is on techniques that will enhance counselors' skills and build their repertoire of strategies to use to connect with children and adolescents." -Tamara E. Davis, EdD Marymount University.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Problem youth -- Counseling of.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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How to Listen so Parents Will Talk and Talk so Parents Will Listen [electronic resource]. by Sommers-Flanagan, John.; Sommers-Flanagan, Rita.;
How to Listen so Parents Will Talk and Talk so Parents Will Listen; Contents; Case Examples; Preface; PART ONE: Understanding and Being With Parents; 1 A Way of Being With Parents; 2 Preparing Yourself to Work Effectively With Parents; 3 What Parents Want: A Model for Understanding Adult Influence; PART TWO: Strategies for Working With Parents; 4 From Initial Contact to Assessment: Building and Maintaining a Working Relationship With Parents; 5 Collaborative Problem Formulation; 6 Creating and Providing Guidance, Advice, and Solutions; PART THREE: Practical Techniques for Parenting Challenges7 Teaching Relationship-Based Interventions to Parents8 Sharing Power to Gain Influence: Indirect and Problem-Solving Interventions; 9 A New-and-Improved Behaviorism: Child-Friendly but Direct Approaches to Discipline; 10 Ongoing Contact, Complications, and Referrals; 11 Dealing With Special Situations and Issues; APPENDIX A: An Annotated Bibliography of Parenting Books; APPENDIX B: Tip Sheets for Parents; APPENDIX C: Parent Satisfaction and Counselor Reflection Inventory; APPENDIX D: Master List of Attitudes, Strategies, and Interventions; APPENDIX E: Chapter ChecklistsAPPENDIX F: Parent Homework AssignmentsReferences; Author Index; Subject Index""In keeping with person-centered theory and therapy, John and Rita Sommers-Flanagan have produced a book that will be immensely helpful for professionals who work with parents. Throughout the pages, there are many examples of practitioners honoring and respecting parents and listening deeply to how best be of help. I am delighted that this book continues to echo and expand on my father's work.""<br /> -<b>Natalie Rogers, PhD, REAT, author, <i>The Creative Connection</i> and <i>The Creative Connections for Groups</i></b> ""Because parenting can be such a dizzying task, professionals working w
Subjects: Electronic books.; Child psychotherapy - Parent participation.; Child psychotherapy --Parent participation.; Counselor and client; Counselor and client; Parenting - Psychological aspects.; Parenting --Psychological aspects.; Parent-student counselor relationships.; Parent-student counselor relationships.;
© 2011., Wiley,
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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