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Working with Parents Makes Therapy Work [electronic resource]. by Novick, Kerry Kelly.(DLC)1887456; Novick, Jack.(DLC)1887446;
Acknowledgments -- CHAPTER ONE Parent Work-Introduction and History -- CHAPTER TWO Our Assumptions When We Work with Parents -- CHAPTER THREE Evaluation -- CHAPTER FOUR Recommendation, Setting the Frame, and Working Conditions -- CHAPTER FIVE The Beginning Phase of Treatment -- CHAPTER SIX The Middle Phase of Treatment -- CHAPTER SEVEN The Pretermination Phase of Treatment -- CHAPTER EIGHT The Termination Phase of Treatment -- CHAPTER NINE Posttermination -- CHAPTER TEN The Application of Our Model of Parent Work to Individual Treatment of AdultsCHAPTER ELEVEN Summary and Further Questions -- ReferencesBasing their work on the idea that psychoanalytic therapy and technique require more rather than less from the therapist, the Novicks explore the crucial role of parents' work in child and adolescent treatment. They show that child and adolescent therapies have two goals_restoring the child to progressive development and rebuilding the parent-child relationship as a lifelong resource. With vivid clinical examples, this book illustrates the expanded range of clinical techniques used with parents to establish an alliance at each phase of treatment.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Adolescent analysis.; Adolescent psychotherapy -- Parent participation.; Child analysis; Child psychotherapy -- Parent participation.; Parent and child;
© 2011., Jason Aronson, Inc.,
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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The Parent's Guide to In-Home ABA Programs [electronic resource] : Frequently Asked Questions about Applied Behavior Analysis for your Child with Autism. by Johnson, Elle Olivia.(SAGE)1614467;
The Parent's Guide to In-Home ABA Programs: Frequently Asked Questions about Applied Behavior Analysis for your Child with Autism; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Part 1: The Basics of ABA HomeProgramming; Chapter 1 Getting Started; 1. What is ABA?; 2. Why is ABA being used with my child?; 3. At what age should my child start an ABA program?; 4. What can I expect when my ABA program begins?; 5. How much time will it take?; 6. What if I don't like my child's therapist?; 7. What if my child doesn't like the therapist?8. My ABA therapist is "in training." Can't I have a therapist who is more experienced?9. What qualifications should an ABA therapist have? Can I ask them about their background and special interests?; 10. Why doesn't my ABA therapist know anything about biomedical treatments?; 11. The program supervisor told me that two different therapists would be coming to see my child. Wouldn't it be easier to have just one person?; 12. What does a supervisor do?; 13. What does that ABA agency do?; 14. What is a mandated reporter?15. What if I see a disconnect between ABA therapy and speech therapy, occupational therapy, etc?16. Is ABA the same as discrete trial training?; 17. I've heard that ABA, and especially DTT, will make my child robotic. Is that true?; 18. I'm uncomfortable with strangers in my home. Can't we do sessions at the agency's office instead?; 19. I have to work. Can sessions be done at daycare every day?; 20. What are my responsibilities as a parent?; 21. What is "parent training"?; Chapter 2 During the Session; 1. Where in the house should we do the session?2. What does a typical ABA session involve?3. How can I participate in sessions?; 4. Can my child have an ABA session while I take a nap, watch a movie, or go shopping?; 5. I have an appointment and must end the session early or cancel it. Is that OK?; 6. My ABA therapist had to cancel a session, and has offered to make it up. How does this work?; 7. My child's therapist brings her own toys. Are these clean?; 8. I really want my child to be able to say his name. Why aren't we working on it?; 9. Can my child's siblings play in the session too?10. Can I videotape the session? Can I install a live feed?11. I've noticed that my therapist takes my child outside to play as part of the session. Isn't this a waste of time?; 12. I noticed that my child's ABA therapist spends 20 minutes or so doing paperwork. Why is this?; 13. I noticed that my child's ABA session usually includes some time spent at the table. Can you tell me why they do so much work there?; 14. I keep offering my ABA therapist a meal, and they always refuse. Why are they so rude?15. I thought my child would really like this. Instead, he cries frequently during session. What's wrong?Concise and practical, this handbook explains the ins and outs of Applied Behavior Analysis in a chatty Q&A format. It covers everything parents need to know from what a typical in-home session will entail, to how to navigate their relationship with their ABA therapist, to how to get more involved and begin using ABA methods themselves.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Autistic children -- Rehabilitation.; Behavior therapy for children; Child psychotherapy -- Parent participation.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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How to Listen so Parents Will Talk and Talk so Parents Will Listen [electronic resource]. by Sommers-Flanagan, John.; Sommers-Flanagan, Rita.;
How to Listen so Parents Will Talk and Talk so Parents Will Listen; Contents; Case Examples; Preface; PART ONE: Understanding and Being With Parents; 1 A Way of Being With Parents; 2 Preparing Yourself to Work Effectively With Parents; 3 What Parents Want: A Model for Understanding Adult Influence; PART TWO: Strategies for Working With Parents; 4 From Initial Contact to Assessment: Building and Maintaining a Working Relationship With Parents; 5 Collaborative Problem Formulation; 6 Creating and Providing Guidance, Advice, and Solutions; PART THREE: Practical Techniques for Parenting Challenges7 Teaching Relationship-Based Interventions to Parents8 Sharing Power to Gain Influence: Indirect and Problem-Solving Interventions; 9 A New-and-Improved Behaviorism: Child-Friendly but Direct Approaches to Discipline; 10 Ongoing Contact, Complications, and Referrals; 11 Dealing With Special Situations and Issues; APPENDIX A: An Annotated Bibliography of Parenting Books; APPENDIX B: Tip Sheets for Parents; APPENDIX C: Parent Satisfaction and Counselor Reflection Inventory; APPENDIX D: Master List of Attitudes, Strategies, and Interventions; APPENDIX E: Chapter ChecklistsAPPENDIX F: Parent Homework AssignmentsReferences; Author Index; Subject Index""In keeping with person-centered theory and therapy, John and Rita Sommers-Flanagan have produced a book that will be immensely helpful for professionals who work with parents. Throughout the pages, there are many examples of practitioners honoring and respecting parents and listening deeply to how best be of help. I am delighted that this book continues to echo and expand on my father's work.""<br /> -<b>Natalie Rogers, PhD, REAT, author, <i>The Creative Connection</i> and <i>The Creative Connections for Groups</i></b> ""Because parenting can be such a dizzying task, professionals working w
Subjects: Electronic books.; Child psychotherapy - Parent participation.; Child psychotherapy --Parent participation.; Counselor and client; Counselor and client; Parenting - Psychological aspects.; Parenting --Psychological aspects.; Parent-student counselor relationships.; Parent-student counselor relationships.;
© 2011., Wiley,
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Activity Groups in Family-Centered Treatment : Psychiatric Occupational Therapy Approaches for Parents and Children. by Olson, Laurette.;
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. What Do We Know About the Daily Interactions Between Children with Mental Illness and Their Parents? -- Chapter 3. Introducing Parents and Children Participating in One Parent-Child Group on a Child Inpatient Psychiatric Unit -- Chapter 4. One Parent Child Activity Group: A Framework and Snapshots -- Chapter 5. A Qualitative Research Study of One Parent-Child Activity Group -- Chapter 6. Exploring What Was Missing in One Parent-Child Activity Group -- Chapter 7. Parent-Child Activity Groups Reconsidered -- Chapter 8. Engaging Psychiatrically Hospitalized Teens with Their Parents Through a Parent-Adolescent Activity Group -- Chapter 9. When a Mother Is Depressed: Supporting Her Capacity to Participate in Co-Occupation with Her Baby-A Case Study -- Chapter 10. Closing Thoughts About Promoting Parent-Child Co-Occupation Through Parent-Child Activity Intervention -- Index.Get the tools for practical family-based interventions for children or adolescents with mental illness Providing parent-child occupation-based interventions can be one of the most important therapeutic services offered to children or parents with mental illness and their families. Activity Groups in Family-Centered Treatment: Psychiatric Occupational Therapy Approaches for Parents and Children provides useful in depth how to strategies into the processes of providing family occupation-based group intervention when a child has a mental illness. Occupational therapists working with children or parents with mental illness can learn valuable practical interventions to apply in their own clinical work. Cherished activities that strengthen parent-child bonds are many times lacking in families that include a child or parent with mental illness. Activity Groups in Family-Centered Treatment describes valuable parent-child occupation-based interventions with detailed examples of how they have been provided in therapy. This text provides an overview of the literature related to providing family-based psychiatric OT treatment for children and their families, a framework for providing services, rich descriptions of a parent-child activity group, a parent-adolescent activity group, and case studies of inpatient and home-based occupation based interventions. Topics in Activity Groups in Family-Centered Treatment include: an overview of theory and research literature on the nature of the interaction between parents and children with emotional disorders detailed case studies of family challenges with mental illness a framework for parent-child activity groups a qualitative study of a parent-child activity group analysis of the barriers that can arise in a parent-child activity group clinical experiences leading a parent-adolescent activity group analysis of theinfluences of culture within a parent-child activity group a case study of the intervention for a depressed mother and her family issues between parents and professionals when children are psychiatrically hospitalized Activity Groups in Family-Centered Treatment provides occupational therapists and other professionals who lead parent-child groups or who work with families that include a child or parent with mental illness with integral tools to effectively treat their clients.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Family psychotherapy; Mentally ill parents; Occupational therapy for children; Occupational therapy; Parent and child;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Middle-Class Waifs : The Psychodynamic Treatment of Affectively Disturbed Children. by Siegel, Elaine V.;
MIDDLE-CLASS WAIFS The Psychodynamic Treatment of Affectively Disturbed Children -- Copyright -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- Chapter 2 But I Don't Want to Be Me-Children Who Don't Accept Their Gender and Its Functions -- Chapter 3 I'm Really Really Scared and I Feel So Bad-Children Who Have Been Exposed to Adult Sex Play -- Chapter 4 I Want To Kick the World to Pieces-Children Who Have Been Beaten -- Chapter 5 I Don't Understand Anything at All -Children Who Have Suffered Sexual Abuse -- Chapter 6 I'd Really Like to Kill My Mom and Dad-Children Who Live Behind an Emotional Mask -- Chapter 7 Some Theoretical and Treatment Considerations - Mental Representation: The Infant as Active Participant in the Care Giver-Child Dyad -- References -- Index.In this volume, a well-known psychoanalyst, dance therapist, and educational consultant chronicles her clinical work with deeply troubled children who fall between the cracks of our diagnostic and educational systems. These children, who frequently turn out to have been sexually or punitively abused, have no real emotional home despite the fact that they live in materially comfortable circumstances. In spite of their apparent brightness and precocity, they do not thrive in the classroom, where their disruptive behavior, tendency to act out, and fragmented learning bring them to the attention of teachers, counselors, and school psychologists. Standard diagnoses do not explain their plight; such children are neither retarded nor learning disabled nor neurotic. Through poignant case studies, Siegel reviews the developmental circumstances that bring these middle-class waifs to a critical impasse with both their parents and the educational establishment. Time and again she discovers that the children's expectable developmental course has been derailed by their accommodation to parental abuse and deformed parental expectations. Psychodynamic treatment invariably uncovers the maladaptive solutions that fueled the children's behavioral and learning disturbances. This volume speaks to a broad clinical and non-clinical readership: psychoanalytic clinicians; psychologists; counselors; social workers; art, dance, and music therapists; special education teachers; child therapists; and child care workers. They will all join in admiration of Siegel's treatment approach which focuses on what is healthy in deeply traumatized children and, in so doing, helps debunk the myth of the untreatable child.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Affective disorders in children; Child psychotherapy;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Middle-Class Waifs : The Psychodynamic Treatment of Affectively Disturbed Children. by Siegel, Elaine V.;
MIDDLE-CLASS WAIFS The Psychodynamic Treatment of Affectively Disturbed Children -- Copyright -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- Chapter 2 But I Don't Want to Be Me-Children Who Don't Accept Their Gender and Its Functions -- Chapter 3 I'm Really Really Scared and I Feel So Bad-Children Who Have Been Exposed to Adult Sex Play -- Chapter 4 I Want To Kick the World to Pieces-Children Who Have Been Beaten -- Chapter 5 I Don't Understand Anything at All -Children Who Have Suffered Sexual Abuse -- Chapter 6 I'd Really Like to Kill My Mom and Dad-Children Who Live Behind an Emotional Mask -- Chapter 7 Some Theoretical and Treatment Considerations - Mental Representation: The Infant as Active Participant in the Care Giver-Child Dyad -- References -- Index.In this volume, a well-known psychoanalyst, dance therapist, and educational consultant chronicles her clinical work with deeply troubled children who fall between the cracks of our diagnostic and educational systems. These children, who frequently turn out to have been sexually or punitively abused, have no real emotional home despite the fact that they live in materially comfortable circumstances. In spite of their apparent brightness and precocity, they do not thrive in the classroom, where their disruptive behavior, tendency to act out, and fragmented learning bring them to the attention of teachers, counselors, and school psychologists. Standard diagnoses do not explain their plight; such children are neither retarded nor learning disabled nor neurotic. Through poignant case studies, Siegel reviews the developmental circumstances that bring these middle-class waifs to a critical impasse with both their parents and the educational establishment. Time and again she discovers that the children's expectable developmental course has been derailed by their accommodation to parental abuse and deformed parental expectations. Psychodynamic treatment invariably uncovers the maladaptive solutions that fueled the children's behavioral and learning disturbances. This volume speaks to a broad clinical and non-clinical readership: psychoanalytic clinicians; psychologists; counselors; social workers; art, dance, and music therapists; special education teachers; child therapists; and child care workers. They will all join in admiration of Siegel's treatment approach which focuses on what is healthy in deeply traumatized children and, in so doing, helps debunk the myth of the untreatable child.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Affective disorders in children; Child psychotherapy;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Group Filial Therapy [electronic resource] : Training Parents to Conduct Special Play Sessions with Their Own Children. by Guerney, Louise.; Ryan, Virginia.(SAGE)1866975;
Group Filial Therapy: The Complete Guide to Teaching Parents to Play Therapeutically with their Children; Introduction; 1. An Overviewof FT and GFT; The history of FT; The theoretical underpinnings of FT; Research in FT; An overview of the rationale, goals, and aims of FT; Group Filial Therapy; The overall structure of a GFT program; Clinical issues when starting a GFT program: leaders; Clinical issues when starting a GFT program: families; Scheduling weekly meetings; 2. The Selection of Suitable Participants and the Intake Process for GFT; The selection process in GFTGeneral selection issuesThe intake process for GFT; 3. Guidelines for Conducting Successful GFT Groups; General leadership skills required for GFT; Maximizing success in skills practice; Leading discussions in GFT; Additional group inclusion issues for leaders; Two particular challenges for GFT leaders; 4. The Main Skills Parents Learn in GFT; The main play therapy skills for GFT; Skill 1: focusing on children's feelings and actions-empathy, empathic responding and tracking; Skill 2: following children's lead; Skill 3: structuring play sessions; Skill 4: limiting children's behavior5. Starting the GFT Program: Meeting 1Beginning GFT; Providing an overview of FT; Demonstration of a play session; The second half of the meeting; Technical and practical issues; 6. Starting Play Demonstrations and Skills Learning: Meeting 2; The second meeting; Discussion of demos; Discussion of the leaders' interactions during the demos; 7. Continuing Demonstrations and Skills Practice: Meeting 3; The third meeting; Beginning skills training; 8. Continuing Demonstrations and Skills Practice: Meeting 4; Skills training: following children's lead; Skills training: structuringSkills training: limit settingPreparing for mock sessions; 9. Mock Play Sessions and Preparation for Practice Play Sessions: Meeting 5; Conducting mock sessions; Formal discussion of mock play sessions; Preparation for next meeting's practice play sessions; 10. Beginning Practice Play Sessions: Meetings 6-7; Considerations for leaders during this phase of the program; Parents' first play sessions; 11. Parents' Second Practice Play Sessions: Meetings 8-10; Second practice play sessions; Special issues for leaders during this phase of GFT; Preliminary discussion of toys and equipmentFurther preparation for home sessions12. Transition to Home Play Sessions: Meetings 11-12; Readiness of parents for home sessions; Preparations for home sessions and their impact on children and family life; Special issues arising for parents in home sessions; Meeting 12: processing first home play sessions with the group; Preparing parents for subsequent meetings; 13 Early Home Play Sessions: Meetings 13-15; Early home sessions; Addressing parents' competence in early home sessions; Including toddlers, teenagers and other auxiliary children in home sessions; Play themesCommon challenges arising in home play sessionsIn Group Filial Therapy (GFT), therapists train parents to conduct play sessions with their children. This book provides an accessible guide to the theory and practice of GFT, and for the first time offers step-by-step guidelines for implementing the GFT program developed by Dr Guerney.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Family psychotherapy; Group play therapy.; Group psychotherapy for children.; Parent-child interaction therapy.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Traumatic Brain Injury : Rehabilitation for Everyday Adaptive Living, 2nd Edition. by Ponsford, Jennie.; Sloan, Sue.; Snow, Pamela.;
Cover -- Traumatic Brain Injury: Rehabilitation for everyday adaptive living -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface to the First Edition -- Preface to the Second Edition -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Mechanism, Recovery and Sequelae of Traumatic Brain Injury a Foundation for the Real -- Introduction -- Epidemiology -- Pathophysiology -- Neuroimaging and TBI -- Recovery from TBI -- Impairment of Consciousness -- Ongoing Sensorimotor Disabilities -- Cognitive and Behavioural Sequelae -- Consequences of Neurobehavioural Sequelae for Rehabilitation and Outcome -- Summary and Conclusions -- Principles Underlying Successful Rehabilitation Following Tbi - the Real Approach -- 2. Assessing and Managing Impairment of Consciousness Following Tbi -- Coma -- Post-Traumatic Amnesia (pta) -- Making the Transition to Oral Feeding -- Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States After Severe TBI -- Neuroimaging: Ct, Mri, Fmri, Spect -- Electrophysiological Studies -- Clinical Measurement Tools for Use with Patients Who Are in a Vegetative or Minimally Responsive State -- Helping the Family of the Patient in a Minimally Conscious State or Vegetative State -- 3. Assessment of Participation, Activity and Cognition Following Tbi -- Introduction -- Participation Following Tbi -- Assessment of Impairment of Cognitive Function -- The Role of Neuropsychological Assessment in the Rehabilitation Process -- Case Report - Robert -- Case Report - Sandra -- 4. Managing Cognitive Problems Following TBI -- Introduction -- Approaches to Cognitive Rehabilitation -- Managing Memory Difficulties -- Managing Executive Dysfunction -- Influence of Self-Awareness and Insight -- Applying Functional Skills Training Directly in Everyday Activities and Settings -- Conclusions from the Research to Date -- Evaluating the Impact of Interventions.Clinical Application of Rehabilitation for Everyday Adaptive Living (Real) -- Case Report - Sandra -- Case Report - Robert -- Case Report - George -- Case Report - Bradley -- Conclusions -- 5. Communication Competence Following TBI: Assessment and Management -- Communication and Tbi: An Overview -- The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (Icf) and Communication Competence After TBI -- Communicative Competence After TBI: An "Iceberg" Model -- Social Cognition: Theory of Mind, Social Inferencing and Reading Facial Expressions -- Conversational and Narrative Discourse Skills -- Assessing Communicative Competence: a "Top Down" Approach -- Conversational Assessment -- Using the Principles of the Real Approach to Improve Communicative Competence -- Case Report - Tom -- Conclusion -- 6. Assessment and Management of Behaviour Problems -- Introduction -- Education and Involvement of Staff and Family -- Assessment of Behaviour Problems -- Pharmacological Treatment of Behaviour Problems -- Contextual Approaches to Behaviour Problems -- Contingency Management Approaches -- Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports -- Applications of Environmental and Behavioural Approaches to Problems Commonly Encountered in a General Rehabilitation Unit -- Suggested Guidelines for Dealing with Some Behaviour Problems Encountered Following TBI -- Applications of Behavioural Techniques to Achieve Therapeutic Goals -- Management of Behaviour Problems in Community Settings -- Case Report - Tim -- Case Report - Chris -- Case Report - Andrea -- Conclusions -- 7. Returning to the Community -- Introduction -- Living Skills and Accommodation -- Case Report - Craig -- Return to Employment -- Case Report - Mark -- Case Report - Steve -- Returning to Tertiary Study -- Case Report - Raymond -- Avocational Interests -- Friendships.Driver Assessment and Rehabilitation -- Conclusions -- 8. Dealing with the Impact of Tbi on Psychological Adjustment and Relationships -- Introduction -- Emotional Reactions to Moderate and Severe Tbi -- Self-Awareness and Self-Esteem Following Tbi -- Approaches to Therapy for Specific Emotional or Interpersonal Problems -- Depression Following TBI -- Anxiety Disorders Following TBI -- Substance Abuse -- Anger Management -- Marital and Relationship Problems -- Sexuality Following TBI -- Case Report - Danielle -- Case Report - Julie -- Case Report - Michael -- Conclusions -- 9. Working with Families -- Introduction -- Common Family Responses to TBI -- The Impact of Tbi on Marital, Sibling and Parent-Child Relationships -- Sources of Stress on Families Following TBI -- Methods of Coping with TBI in the Family -- How to Help Families -- Advocacy and Support Agencies -- Legal Issues -- Case Report - Abdul -- Conclusions -- 10. Traumatic Brain Injury in Children -- Introduction -- Causes of Injury -- Pathophysiology -- Pre-Disposing Factors -- Recovery -- Cognitive Sequelae of Mild Tbi in Children -- Cognitive Deficits Displayed by Children Following Moderate or Severe TBI -- Interaction Between Age and Recovery -- Scholastic Performance Following TBI -- Behavioural and Psychiatric Sequelae of TBI in Children -- Summary of Differences Between TBI in Children and Adults -- The Real Approach to Assessment and Rehabilitation of Children with TBI -- Case Report - Laura -- Case Report - Chris -- Family Needs -- Conclusions -- References -- Author Index -- Subject Index.Research into the rehabilitation of individuals following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the past 15 years has resulted in greater understanding of the condition. The second edition of this book provides an updated guide for health professionals working with individuals recovering from TBI. Its uniquely clinical focus provides both comprehensive background information, and practical strategies for dealing with common problems with thinking, memory, communication, behaviour and emotional adjustment in both adults and children. The book addresses a wide range of challenges, from those which begin with impairment of consciousness, to those occurring for many years after injury, and presents strategies for maximising participation in all aspects of community life. The book will be of use to practising clinicians, students in health disciplines relevant to neurorehabilitation, and also to the families of individuals with traumatic brain injury.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Brain damage -- Patients -- Rehabilitation.;Vocational rehabilitation.;Neuropsychological tests.;Psychotherapy.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access.;
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Traumatic Brain Injury : Rehabilitation for Everyday Adaptive Living, 2nd Edition. by Ponsford, Jennie.; Sloan, Sue.; Snow, Pamela.;
Cover -- Traumatic Brain Injury: Rehabilitation for everyday adaptive living -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface to the First Edition -- Preface to the Second Edition -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Mechanism, Recovery and Sequelae of Traumatic Brain Injury a Foundation for the Real -- Introduction -- Epidemiology -- Pathophysiology -- Neuroimaging and TBI -- Recovery from TBI -- Impairment of Consciousness -- Ongoing Sensorimotor Disabilities -- Cognitive and Behavioural Sequelae -- Consequences of Neurobehavioural Sequelae for Rehabilitation and Outcome -- Summary and Conclusions -- Principles Underlying Successful Rehabilitation Following Tbi - the Real Approach -- 2. Assessing and Managing Impairment of Consciousness Following Tbi -- Coma -- Post-Traumatic Amnesia (pta) -- Making the Transition to Oral Feeding -- Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States After Severe TBI -- Neuroimaging: Ct, Mri, Fmri, Spect -- Electrophysiological Studies -- Clinical Measurement Tools for Use with Patients Who Are in a Vegetative or Minimally Responsive State -- Helping the Family of the Patient in a Minimally Conscious State or Vegetative State -- 3. Assessment of Participation, Activity and Cognition Following Tbi -- Introduction -- Participation Following Tbi -- Assessment of Impairment of Cognitive Function -- The Role of Neuropsychological Assessment in the Rehabilitation Process -- Case Report - Robert -- Case Report - Sandra -- 4. Managing Cognitive Problems Following TBI -- Introduction -- Approaches to Cognitive Rehabilitation -- Managing Memory Difficulties -- Managing Executive Dysfunction -- Influence of Self-Awareness and Insight -- Applying Functional Skills Training Directly in Everyday Activities and Settings -- Conclusions from the Research to Date -- Evaluating the Impact of Interventions.Clinical Application of Rehabilitation for Everyday Adaptive Living (Real) -- Case Report - Sandra -- Case Report - Robert -- Case Report - George -- Case Report - Bradley -- Conclusions -- 5. Communication Competence Following TBI: Assessment and Management -- Communication and Tbi: An Overview -- The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (Icf) and Communication Competence After TBI -- Communicative Competence After TBI: An "Iceberg" Model -- Social Cognition: Theory of Mind, Social Inferencing and Reading Facial Expressions -- Conversational and Narrative Discourse Skills -- Assessing Communicative Competence: a "Top Down" Approach -- Conversational Assessment -- Using the Principles of the Real Approach to Improve Communicative Competence -- Case Report - Tom -- Conclusion -- 6. Assessment and Management of Behaviour Problems -- Introduction -- Education and Involvement of Staff and Family -- Assessment of Behaviour Problems -- Pharmacological Treatment of Behaviour Problems -- Contextual Approaches to Behaviour Problems -- Contingency Management Approaches -- Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports -- Applications of Environmental and Behavioural Approaches to Problems Commonly Encountered in a General Rehabilitation Unit -- Suggested Guidelines for Dealing with Some Behaviour Problems Encountered Following TBI -- Applications of Behavioural Techniques to Achieve Therapeutic Goals -- Management of Behaviour Problems in Community Settings -- Case Report - Tim -- Case Report - Chris -- Case Report - Andrea -- Conclusions -- 7. Returning to the Community -- Introduction -- Living Skills and Accommodation -- Case Report - Craig -- Return to Employment -- Case Report - Mark -- Case Report - Steve -- Returning to Tertiary Study -- Case Report - Raymond -- Avocational Interests -- Friendships.Driver Assessment and Rehabilitation -- Conclusions -- 8. Dealing with the Impact of Tbi on Psychological Adjustment and Relationships -- Introduction -- Emotional Reactions to Moderate and Severe Tbi -- Self-Awareness and Self-Esteem Following Tbi -- Approaches to Therapy for Specific Emotional or Interpersonal Problems -- Depression Following TBI -- Anxiety Disorders Following TBI -- Substance Abuse -- Anger Management -- Marital and Relationship Problems -- Sexuality Following TBI -- Case Report - Danielle -- Case Report - Julie -- Case Report - Michael -- Conclusions -- 9. Working with Families -- Introduction -- Common Family Responses to TBI -- The Impact of Tbi on Marital, Sibling and Parent-Child Relationships -- Sources of Stress on Families Following TBI -- Methods of Coping with TBI in the Family -- How to Help Families -- Advocacy and Support Agencies -- Legal Issues -- Case Report - Abdul -- Conclusions -- 10. Traumatic Brain Injury in Children -- Introduction -- Causes of Injury -- Pathophysiology -- Pre-Disposing Factors -- Recovery -- Cognitive Sequelae of Mild Tbi in Children -- Cognitive Deficits Displayed by Children Following Moderate or Severe TBI -- Interaction Between Age and Recovery -- Scholastic Performance Following TBI -- Behavioural and Psychiatric Sequelae of TBI in Children -- Summary of Differences Between TBI in Children and Adults -- The Real Approach to Assessment and Rehabilitation of Children with TBI -- Case Report - Laura -- Case Report - Chris -- Family Needs -- Conclusions -- References -- Author Index -- Subject Index.Research into the rehabilitation of individuals following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the past 15 years has resulted in greater understanding of the condition. The second edition of this book provides an updated guide for health professionals working with individuals recovering from TBI. Its uniquely clinical focus provides both comprehensive background information, and practical strategies for dealing with common problems with thinking, memory, communication, behaviour and emotional adjustment in both adults and children. The book addresses a wide range of challenges, from those which begin with impairment of consciousness, to those occurring for many years after injury, and presents strategies for maximising participation in all aspects of community life. The book will be of use to practising clinicians, students in health disciplines relevant to neurorehabilitation, and also to the families of individuals with traumatic brain injury.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Brain damage -- Patients -- Rehabilitation.;Vocational rehabilitation.;Neuropsychological tests.;Psychotherapy.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
unAPI

Variations on Teaching and Supervising Group Therapy. by Lewis, Karen G.;
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Introduction -- Supervision of Groups -- Overview of This Issue -- Chapter 1: Group Supervision: A Psychodynamic Perspective -- Introduction -- Initial Description -- Supervisory Method -- Theoretical Formulations -- The Process of Learning -- Supervisor's Affective and Transferential Experience -- Concluding Statement -- Postscript -- Chapter 2: A Systemic Perspective of Group Therapy Supervision: Use of Energy in the Supervisor-Therapist-Group System -- Background for a Systemic Approach to Group Therapy Supervision -- Group Supervisor Energy in the Therapy Group System -- When Energies Are Blocked or Misdirected -- Summary -- Chapter 3: Teaching Psychodrama: A Workshop -- The Experience -- Key Concepts that Have Influenced My Work -- Summary -- Chapter 4: Circular Learning: Teaching and Learning Gestalt Therapy in Groups -- History -- What Is Gestalt Therapy? -- Cycle of Experience -- The Experiment -- Resistances -- The Therapeutic Role -- The Training Program -- Practicum -- Summary -- Chapter 5: Teaching Transactional Analysis and Redecision Therapy -- Key Terms -- Contact -- Clinical Presentation of the Patient -- Contract -- Cons -- Chief Bad Feelings, Thinkings, Behaviors, Psychosomatic Symptoms -- Chronic Games, Belief Systems, Fantasies -- Childhood Early Decisions -- Chief Parental Messages -- Childhood Script Formation and Stroking Patterns -- Nature of Impasses -- Resolution of the Impasse in the Work -- Anchoring and Changing Stroke Patterns -- Plan for the Future -- Summary -- Chapter 6: Teaching Group Therapy Within Social Work Education -- Introduction -- Intellectual Underpinnings -- Group Exercises and Role Plays -- Dealing with Student Fears -- Co-Therapy and Solo Therapy -- Conclusions.Chapter 7: Consultation in Group Therapy with Children and Adolescents -- The Nature of Consultation -- Choosing a Consultant -- Key Variables in the Consultation Process -- Developmental Theories for Child and Adolescent Group Therapy -- Creating an Institutional "Fit" -- The Inside-Outside Nature of Consultation -- Conclusion -- Chapter 8: Training Mental Health Clinicians to Lead Short-Term Psychotherapy Groups in an HMO -- Stages of Group Development -- Training -- Conclusion -- Chapter 9: Teaching Gender Issues to Male/Female Group Therapists -- Introduction -- Feminist Issues in Therapy -- Gender Sensitive Group Therapists -- Co-Therapy Relationship -- Role of the Supervisor -- Conclusion -- On the Books -- Child Group Psychotherapy: Future Tense -- Time as a Factor in Group Work: Time-Limited Group Experiences -- Research in Social Group Work -- Game Play Therapeutic Games for Children.Learn effective techniques for teaching and supervising group therapy. This unique new volume brings together teaching and supervisory models for a host of theoretical orientations, including psychodynamic, family systems, psychodrama, gestalt, and transactional analysis. Variations on Teaching and Supervising Group Therapy is essential reading for mental health professionals who currently conduct groups but who lack the specialized training for becoming a supervisor who currently teach group therapy from one theoretical orientation and want to learn about other modalities who teach academic courses on group therapy and want to expose students to a broader perspective of group modalities than the usual one or two models--psychoanalytic and activity groups--usually taught in schools The contributing authors are social workers and professionals from other disciplines who represent a cross section of the teachers of the various types of groups being conducted in the United States today. They describe an exciting array of teaching formats--one-day workshops, semester-long courses, year-long training programs, weekly supervision sessions, and outside consultation--and settings, including family service agencies, child guidance centers, short-term health maintenance organizations, freestanding group training institutions, and private practice. Some of the highlights of this practical book include an examination of the most commonly used format in group therapy today--psychodynamics a demonstration of using family systems theory to understand the group therapy participants and process the key concepts and history of psychodrama the key concepts and basic aspects of a gestalt training program for practicing therapists strategies for teaching social work students a look at the skills needed for conducting group therapy with children a model for trainingtherapists who conduct short-term groups.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Group psychotherapy;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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