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Composition [electronic resource (video)] / by Arts Council of England(SAGE)2091412; Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm)(SAGE)1984150; Films Media Group(SAGE)1996584;
Artistic Composition (3:24) -- Canvas as Painting Surface (1:07) -- Creative Process (4:00) -- Composition by Intuition (2:15) -- Composition by Geometric Precision (1:31) -- Color and Light (4:14) -- Force of Color (2:57) -- Layers of Color (2:26) -- Cropped Paintings (2:23) -- Finished Painting (3:32)Everyone has the desire to arrange things in a way that is most pleasing to the eye. In painting, composition involves arranging every ingredient-shape, color, texture, and light-so that working together, they create artistic balance. In this program, artist Ray Richardson deliberately chooses a long, slim canvas to challenge his compositional abilities. As he confronts his quest to create a cinemascopic work, students begin to appreciate the composition techniques of painters such as Piero della Francesca, Tintoretto, Degas, and Matisse.11 & up.Mode of access: Internet.System requirements: FOD playback platform.Title from distributor's description.
Subjects: Educational films.; Internet videos.; Videorecording.; Art criticism; Drawing; Painting; Visual communication; Visual literacy; Visual perception;
© [2006], c1997., Films Media Group,
On-line resources: http://cgcc-access.sage.eou.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?aid=22322&xtid=7765 -- Part of the Films on Demand collection.;
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Greek Art. by Morais, Rui.;
Cover -- Title Pgae -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Figures -- Foreword -- Maria Helena da Rocha-Pereira: the Suitable Kairos Back Again -- Delfim Leão -- The Transmission of Iconographic Designs and Decorative Compositions -- Delfim Leão -- 1. Prolegomena -- 1. Prolegomena -- The Transmission of Iconographic Designs and Decorative Compositions -- 2. The Transmission of Iconographic Designs and Decorative Compositions -- in The Greek World -- 2. The Transmission of Iconographic Designs and Decorative Compositions -- in The Greek World -- 3. Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit et artes intulit agresti Latio -- 3. Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit et artes intulit agresti Latio -- 4. Case Studies -- Bibliography.One of the most fascinating topics in the study of ancient art concerns artistic practices and models and the means of transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. This study presents some examples that suggest the existence of pattern books Ancient Greece.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Subjects: Electronic books.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Electronic Art. by Malina, Roger F.; Plas, W. Van der.; Hokken, T.; Biggelaar, J. den.;
Front Cover -- Electronic Art -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- EDITORIAL -- Chapter 1. Perceptual Correspondences of Abstract Animation and Synthetic Sound -- DYNAMICS -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2. Art and Education in the Telematic Culture -- APPENDIX -- References -- Chapter 3. The Electronic Bauhaus: Gestalt Technologies and the Electronic Challenge to Visual Art -- THE ISDN FOR ART: TOWARDS ANARCHITECTURE OF COMMUNICATION -- ECOTECHNOLOGY:DESIGN WITHECOLOGY -- THE EXPERT SYSTEMARTIST:FIFTH-GENERATIONCOMPUTER CULTURE -- References and Notes -- Chapter 4. Logic and Time-Based Art Practice -- SYSTEMATIC CONSTRUCTION -- LOGIC PROGRAMMINGAND IMAGE HANDLING -- THE INFERENCE SYSTEM AND STRUCTURES IN TIME -- JASPER: A SAMPLE WORK -- FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES -- Chapter 5. Computational Art -- THE CONSTRUCTION OF AN IMAGINATIVE ARTIFACT -- NOTATIONAL SYSTEMS -- THE ALGORITHMIC GENIUS -- CONCLUSION -- References -- Chapter 6. Establishing a Tonic Space with Digital Color -- TONIC SPACE -- METHOD OF MEASURE -- TOWARDS DIGITAL COLOR CONCORD -- RESERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS -- Acknowledgments -- Selected Reading -- Chapter 7. The Creation Station: An Approach to a Multimedia Workstation -- INTRODUCTION TO THE CREATION STATION -- SOME SPECIFIC DESIGN CRITERIA -- POTENTIAL PROGRAMMING OBSTACLES -- INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES AND OBJECTIVE-C -- PROGRAMMING IN OOPLS -- THE CREATION STATION BASICS -- THE EDITOR AND EDITORUI -- CONCLUSION -- Bibliography -- Chapter 8. Computer Music Languages . . .and the Real World -- COMPUTER MUSIC LANGUAGES -- PROPOSAL FOR CLASSIFICATION -- CLASSIFICATION FOR PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES -- CLASSIFICATION FOR MUSIC LANGUAGES -- CONCLUSIONS -- References and Notes -- Further Reading -- Chapter 9. Computer Graphics and Animationas Agents of Personal Evolution in the Arts.THE CHARACTERISTICS OF 'COMPUTER ART' -- THE CONSTRAINTSOF COMPUTER GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY -- THE CREATIVE ACT AS PERSONAL EVOLUTION -- THECHARACTERISTICS OF CREATIVE PROCESS -- THE COMPUTER AS AN EVOLUTIONARY AGENT -- References -- Chapter 10. Storing Art Images in Intelligent Computers -- THE STORAGE PROBLEM -- RECOVERING IMAGES FROM STORAGE -- PROVIDING IMAGE INTELLIGENCE TO THE COMPUTER -- ECONOMY RESULTING FROM INTELLIGENT IMAGE STORAGE -- CONCLUSION -- Acknowledgement -- References and Notes -- Chapter 11. The Making of a Film with Synthetic Actors -- SCENARIO -- CREATION OF THE ACTORS -- ANIMATING THE HUMAN BODY -- ANIMATING THE HANDS -- ANIMATING A HUMAN FACE -- REALISTIC ASPECTS -- SYNTHETIC CAMERAS AND LIGHTS -- References and Notes -- Chapter 12. Towards a Universal and Intelligent MIDI-Based Stage System: A Composer/Performer's Testimony -- ROBOTICS IN SYNCHOROS -- SYNCHOROS IN THE CONYINUITY -- THE CURRENT SYNCHOROS SYSTEM -- METHODOLOGY:A NEW MUSIC-MACHINE RELATIONSHIP -- INTERDEPENDENCE OF THE MUSICAL LEVELS -- DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYSTEM -- Chapter 13. Geometric Image Modelling of the Musical Object -- THE PATTERN, THE RHYTHM AND THE IMAGE -- GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION OF MUSICAL KNOWLEDGE -- GRAPHIC SPECTRAL REPRESENTATION OF THE MUSICAL PHRASE -- CONCLUSION AND FUTURE APPLICATIONS -- References -- Chapter 14. The Computer: Liberator or Jailerof the Creative Spirit -- PREAMBLE -- THE HISTORICAL ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE VISUAL ARTS -- THE ROLE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS IN THE VISUAL ARTS -- IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ART AND AESTHETICS? -- IS THERE A COMPUTER IMAGING AESTHETIC? -- WHAT DO WE MEAN BY 'COMPUTER ART'? -- ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF THE COMPUTER FOR THE ARTIST -- MY OWN WORK -- Reference -- Chapter 15. The Aesthetics of Exhibition:A Discussion of Recent American Computer Art Shows.A HISTORICAL APPROACH TO THE DISPLAY OF NEW ART -- THE CHALLENGES INVOLVED IN THE MOUNTING OF COMPUTER ART -- CONTEMPORARY ART SPACES: STATIC VS.DYNAMIC -- WHAT GETS VIEWED -- ART GALLERIES OF THE FUTURE -- References -- Chapter 16. The Staging of Leonardo's Last Supper: A Computer-Based Exploration of Its Perspective -- THE LAST SUPPER -- PERSPECTIVE MODEL -- DISCUSSION -- SUMMARY -- Acknowledgments -- References and Notes -- Chapter 17. State-of-the-Art Art -- HARDWARE, SOFTWARE AND ART -- WHAT IS ART, ANYWAY? -- IT HAS HAPPENED BEFORE -- FUTURE TRENDS -- Chapter 18. A New Language for Artistic Expression: The Electronic Arts Landscape -- A NEW LANGUAGE -- A NEW VOCABULARY -- NEW ART FORMS -- Bibliography -- Chapter 19. Some Issues in the Development of Computer Art as a Mathematical Art Form -- THE COMPUTER AS ARTIST -- Al AND PROBLEMS OF SEMANTICS -- PLATONISM AND FORMALISM IN MATHEMATICS AND ART -- MATHEMATICS AS CULTURE -- MATHEMATICS AS COMPUTER ART -- References -- Chapter 20. Orphics: Computer Graphics and the Shaping of Time with Color -- THEMATIC TRANSFORMATION -- IMAGE FORMATION -- DIMENSIONAL UPGRADES -- THEMATIC DISSOLVES -- DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION -- References and Notes -- ABSTRACTS -- MIXED MEDIA STUDIESIN TACTILITY: ANALTERNATIVE TO 'COMPUTER ART' -- ART COMMUNICATION AND THE WELL -- NEW ART ONLINE -- IMAGE PROCESSING:AN UNDER-UTILIZED RESOURCE FOR COMPUTER ART -- IMAGE PROCESSING -- THEORETICAL STATEMENT CONCERNING COMPUTER/ROBOTIC PAINTINGS -- CYBERNETIC JEWELRY -- EXTENDED MUSICAL INTERFACE WITH THE HUMAN NERVOUS SYSTEM: ASSESSMENT AND PROSPECTUS -- DYNAMIC ON-LINE ARCHITECURE -- PATT_PROCl: A COMPUTER-ASSISTED COMPOSITION PROGRAM.Computers are more and more becoming creative tools in music as well as in the visual arts and design. In the last few years, it has become clear that digital technology provides a platform for multimedia productions as well as a medium for new art forms. Computer Music and Computer Graphics & Animation have their own international forums. The need was felt, however, to bring together the diverse disciplines within art and technology in one international event - the First International Symposium on Electronic Art (FISEA). The Symposium attracted considerable interest and hundreds of papers and proposals were submitted, of which a selection were accepted. This book, also published as a supplement to the journal Leonardo, publishes 20 of these selected papers under the editorship of Wim van der Plas, Ton Hokken and Johan den Biggelaar. This richly illustrated issue on Electronic Art reflects the enormous international interest which FISEA generated and will further stimulate interest in applications of new technology in music, visual arts and design.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Art, Modern -- 20th century.; Computer art -- Exhibitions.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Electronic Art. by Malina, Roger F.; Plas, W. Van der.; Hokken, T.; Biggelaar, J. den.;
Front Cover -- Electronic Art -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- EDITORIAL -- Chapter 1. Perceptual Correspondences of Abstract Animation and Synthetic Sound -- DYNAMICS -- Bibliography -- Chapter 2. Art and Education in the Telematic Culture -- APPENDIX -- References -- Chapter 3. The Electronic Bauhaus: Gestalt Technologies and the Electronic Challenge to Visual Art -- THE ISDN FOR ART: TOWARDS ANARCHITECTURE OF COMMUNICATION -- ECOTECHNOLOGY:DESIGN WITHECOLOGY -- THE EXPERT SYSTEMARTIST:FIFTH-GENERATIONCOMPUTER CULTURE -- References and Notes -- Chapter 4. Logic and Time-Based Art Practice -- SYSTEMATIC CONSTRUCTION -- LOGIC PROGRAMMINGAND IMAGE HANDLING -- THE INFERENCE SYSTEM AND STRUCTURES IN TIME -- JASPER: A SAMPLE WORK -- FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES -- Chapter 5. Computational Art -- THE CONSTRUCTION OF AN IMAGINATIVE ARTIFACT -- NOTATIONAL SYSTEMS -- THE ALGORITHMIC GENIUS -- CONCLUSION -- References -- Chapter 6. Establishing a Tonic Space with Digital Color -- TONIC SPACE -- METHOD OF MEASURE -- TOWARDS DIGITAL COLOR CONCORD -- RESERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS -- Acknowledgments -- Selected Reading -- Chapter 7. The Creation Station: An Approach to a Multimedia Workstation -- INTRODUCTION TO THE CREATION STATION -- SOME SPECIFIC DESIGN CRITERIA -- POTENTIAL PROGRAMMING OBSTACLES -- INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES AND OBJECTIVE-C -- PROGRAMMING IN OOPLS -- THE CREATION STATION BASICS -- THE EDITOR AND EDITORUI -- CONCLUSION -- Bibliography -- Chapter 8. Computer Music Languages . . .and the Real World -- COMPUTER MUSIC LANGUAGES -- PROPOSAL FOR CLASSIFICATION -- CLASSIFICATION FOR PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES -- CLASSIFICATION FOR MUSIC LANGUAGES -- CONCLUSIONS -- References and Notes -- Further Reading -- Chapter 9. Computer Graphics and Animationas Agents of Personal Evolution in the Arts.THE CHARACTERISTICS OF 'COMPUTER ART' -- THE CONSTRAINTSOF COMPUTER GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY -- THE CREATIVE ACT AS PERSONAL EVOLUTION -- THECHARACTERISTICS OF CREATIVE PROCESS -- THE COMPUTER AS AN EVOLUTIONARY AGENT -- References -- Chapter 10. Storing Art Images in Intelligent Computers -- THE STORAGE PROBLEM -- RECOVERING IMAGES FROM STORAGE -- PROVIDING IMAGE INTELLIGENCE TO THE COMPUTER -- ECONOMY RESULTING FROM INTELLIGENT IMAGE STORAGE -- CONCLUSION -- Acknowledgement -- References and Notes -- Chapter 11. The Making of a Film with Synthetic Actors -- SCENARIO -- CREATION OF THE ACTORS -- ANIMATING THE HUMAN BODY -- ANIMATING THE HANDS -- ANIMATING A HUMAN FACE -- REALISTIC ASPECTS -- SYNTHETIC CAMERAS AND LIGHTS -- References and Notes -- Chapter 12. Towards a Universal and Intelligent MIDI-Based Stage System: A Composer/Performer's Testimony -- ROBOTICS IN SYNCHOROS -- SYNCHOROS IN THE CONYINUITY -- THE CURRENT SYNCHOROS SYSTEM -- METHODOLOGY:A NEW MUSIC-MACHINE RELATIONSHIP -- INTERDEPENDENCE OF THE MUSICAL LEVELS -- DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYSTEM -- Chapter 13. Geometric Image Modelling of the Musical Object -- THE PATTERN, THE RHYTHM AND THE IMAGE -- GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION OF MUSICAL KNOWLEDGE -- GRAPHIC SPECTRAL REPRESENTATION OF THE MUSICAL PHRASE -- CONCLUSION AND FUTURE APPLICATIONS -- References -- Chapter 14. The Computer: Liberator or Jailerof the Creative Spirit -- PREAMBLE -- THE HISTORICAL ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE VISUAL ARTS -- THE ROLE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS IN THE VISUAL ARTS -- IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ART AND AESTHETICS? -- IS THERE A COMPUTER IMAGING AESTHETIC? -- WHAT DO WE MEAN BY 'COMPUTER ART'? -- ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF THE COMPUTER FOR THE ARTIST -- MY OWN WORK -- Reference -- Chapter 15. The Aesthetics of Exhibition:A Discussion of Recent American Computer Art Shows.A HISTORICAL APPROACH TO THE DISPLAY OF NEW ART -- THE CHALLENGES INVOLVED IN THE MOUNTING OF COMPUTER ART -- CONTEMPORARY ART SPACES: STATIC VS.DYNAMIC -- WHAT GETS VIEWED -- ART GALLERIES OF THE FUTURE -- References -- Chapter 16. The Staging of Leonardo's Last Supper: A Computer-Based Exploration of Its Perspective -- THE LAST SUPPER -- PERSPECTIVE MODEL -- DISCUSSION -- SUMMARY -- Acknowledgments -- References and Notes -- Chapter 17. State-of-the-Art Art -- HARDWARE, SOFTWARE AND ART -- WHAT IS ART, ANYWAY? -- IT HAS HAPPENED BEFORE -- FUTURE TRENDS -- Chapter 18. A New Language for Artistic Expression: The Electronic Arts Landscape -- A NEW LANGUAGE -- A NEW VOCABULARY -- NEW ART FORMS -- Bibliography -- Chapter 19. Some Issues in the Development of Computer Art as a Mathematical Art Form -- THE COMPUTER AS ARTIST -- Al AND PROBLEMS OF SEMANTICS -- PLATONISM AND FORMALISM IN MATHEMATICS AND ART -- MATHEMATICS AS CULTURE -- MATHEMATICS AS COMPUTER ART -- References -- Chapter 20. Orphics: Computer Graphics and the Shaping of Time with Color -- THEMATIC TRANSFORMATION -- IMAGE FORMATION -- DIMENSIONAL UPGRADES -- THEMATIC DISSOLVES -- DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION -- References and Notes -- ABSTRACTS -- MIXED MEDIA STUDIESIN TACTILITY: ANALTERNATIVE TO 'COMPUTER ART' -- ART COMMUNICATION AND THE WELL -- NEW ART ONLINE -- IMAGE PROCESSING:AN UNDER-UTILIZED RESOURCE FOR COMPUTER ART -- IMAGE PROCESSING -- THEORETICAL STATEMENT CONCERNING COMPUTER/ROBOTIC PAINTINGS -- CYBERNETIC JEWELRY -- EXTENDED MUSICAL INTERFACE WITH THE HUMAN NERVOUS SYSTEM: ASSESSMENT AND PROSPECTUS -- DYNAMIC ON-LINE ARCHITECURE -- PATT_PROCl: A COMPUTER-ASSISTED COMPOSITION PROGRAM.Computers are more and more becoming creative tools in music as well as in the visual arts and design. In the last few years, it has become clear that digital technology provides a platform for multimedia productions as well as a medium for new art forms. Computer Music and Computer Graphics & Animation have their own international forums. The need was felt, however, to bring together the diverse disciplines within art and technology in one international event - the First International Symposium on Electronic Art (FISEA). The Symposium attracted considerable interest and hundreds of papers and proposals were submitted, of which a selection were accepted. This book, also published as a supplement to the journal Leonardo, publishes 20 of these selected papers under the editorship of Wim van der Plas, Ton Hokken and Johan den Biggelaar. This richly illustrated issue on Electronic Art reflects the enormous international interest which FISEA generated and will further stimulate interest in applications of new technology in music, visual arts and design.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Art, Modern -- 20th century.; Computer art -- Exhibitions.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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The Science of the Oven. by This, Hervé(DLC)1951189; Gladding, Jody.; Gladding, Ms Jody.;
Intro -- Contents -- Into the Mouth -- 1 Let Us Play with Our Senses -- 2 Health and Diet -- 3 What Are the Notes? -- 4 The Question of Hors dâoeuvres -- 5 Understanding, Perfecting -- 6 Without Forgetting All That Makes Life Beautiful -- 7 From Molecular Cuisine to Culinary Constructivism -- A Last Bite for the Road -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index.Mayonnaise "takes" when a series of liquids form a semisolid consistency. Eggs, a liquid, become solid as they are heated, whereas, under the same conditions, solids melt. When meat is roasted, its surface browns and it acquires taste and texture. What accounts for these extraordinary transformations? The answer: chemistry and physics. With trademark clarity and wit, Hervé This launches a wry investigation into the chemical art of cooking. Unraveling the science behind common culinary technique and practice, Hervé This breaks food down to its molecular components and matches them to cooking's chemical reactions. He translates the complex processes of the oven into everyday knowledge for professional chefs and casual cooks; demystifies the meaning of taste and the making of flavor; describes the properties of liquids, salts, sugars, oils, and fats; and defines the principles of culinary practice, which endow food with sensual as well as nutritional value. For fans of Hervé This's popular volumes and for newcomers to his celebrated approach, The Science of the Oven fuses the physiology of taste to the molecular structure of bodies and food, expertly expanding the possibilities of the kitchen.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Food - Composition.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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The Truly Soft Side of Software [electronic resource (video)] / by TED Conferences LLC; Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm)(SAGE)1984150; Films Media Group.(SAGE)1996584;
Computers, a Personal Mode of Expression (1:12) -- Scribble (2:53) -- Light and Sound (4:10) -- A Blend of Colors (4:41) -- Visualizing Speech and Song (1:36) -- Credits: The Truly Soft Side of Software (0:04)Half performance artist, half software engineer, Golan Levin manipulates the computer to create improvised soundscapes with dazzling corresponding visuals. Having worked as an academic at MIT and a researcher specializing in computer technology and software engineering, Levin blends high tech and customized software programs to create his own extraordinary audio and visual compositions. Many of his pieces force audience participation, such as Dialtones: A Telesymphony, a concert from 2001 entirely composed of the choreographed ringtones of his audience. In this amazing TEDTalk, Levin shows two programs he wrote to perform his original compositions. "Golan Levin's work combines equal measures of the whimsical, the provocative, and the sublime in a wide variety of online, installation and performance media," says Onedotzero.6 & up.Mode of access: Internet.System requirements: FOD playback platform.Title from distributor's description.
Subjects: Educational films.; Internet videos.; Videorecording.; Performance art.;
© [2012], c2007., Films Media Group,
On-line resources: CGCC online access -- Part of the Films on Demand collection.;
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Illuminated Pixels [electronic resource] : The Why, What, and How of Digital Lighting by Wissler, Virginia.;
""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Introduction""; ""Part I: Foundations (Introduction to the “How�)""; ""Chapter 1 First Things First""; ""1.1 Getting Started""; ""1.2 Basic Computer-Generated Light Types""; ""1.3 Simple Lighting Techniques""; ""1.4 Render Basics""; ""1.5 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 2 Shadows""; ""2.1 Before Technique""; ""2.2 Shadow Basics""; ""2.3 Shadow Generation""; ""2.4 Shadow Parameters""; ""2.5 Shadow Workflow and Efficiency Tips""; ""2.6 Gallery of Shadow Problems and Solutions""; ""2.7 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Part II: The Goals of Lighting (the “Why�)""""Chapter 3 Goal 1: Establishing Setting""""3.1 Time of Day""; ""3.2 Weather""; ""3.3 Location""; ""3.4 Setting and Story""; ""3.5 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 4 Goal 2: Creating Mood""; ""4.1 Visual Tension""; ""4.2 Color and Emotion""; ""4.3 Revealing Action, Ambience, and Character""; ""4.4 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 5 Goal 3: Directing the Eye""; ""5.1 Composition""; ""5.2 Visual Attractors""; ""5.3 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 6 Goals 4�6: Creating the Illusion of Dimension""; ""6.1 Goal 4: Creating Depth""; ""6.2 Goal 5: Sculpting Volume""""6.3 Goal 6: Revealing Substance""""6.4 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 7 Goals 7�10: Providing Cohesiveness and Visual Interest""; ""7.1 Goal 7: Maintaining Continuity""; ""7.2 Goal 8: Integrating Digital Elements""; ""7.3 Goal 9: Setting the Visual Style""; ""7.4 Goal 10: Creating Visual Interest""; ""7.5 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Part III: The Properties of Light (the “What�)""; ""Chapter 8 Light Placement""; ""8.1 Direction""; ""8.2 Distance""; ""8.3 Making It Right""; ""8.4 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 9 Light Intensity""; ""9.1 Controlling Luminance""""9.2 Evaluating Luminance""""9.3 Capturing Luminance""; ""9.4 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 10 Light Diffusion""; ""10.1 Overview of Light Diffusion""; ""10.2 Hard Light""; ""10.3 Soft Light""; ""10.4 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 11 Light Color""; ""11.1 The Science of Color""; ""11.2 Color Temperature""; ""11.3 Light and Pigment""; ""11.4 Digital Color Representation""; ""11.5 Light and Surface Color Interaction""; ""11.6 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Part IV: Technique (More “How�)""; ""Chapter 12 Three-Point Lighting and Beyond""; ""12.1 Three-Point Lighting""""12.2 Beyond Three-Point Lighting""""12.3 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 13 Camera Essentials""; ""13.1 Lens Work: Field of View and Depth of Field""; ""13.2 Camera Exposure""; ""13.3 Motion Blur""; ""13.4 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 14 Rendering for the Artist""; ""14.1 Render Workflow""; ""14.2 Scanline and Ray Tracing “Under the Hood�""; ""14.3 Ray-Traced Reflections and Refractions""; ""14.4 Quality Control""; ""14.5 Chapter Conclusion""; ""Chapter 15 Tricks of the Trade""; ""15.1 Shaping Light""; ""15.2 Advanced Shadow Techniques""; ""15.3 Faking Soft Light""""15.4 Simple Effects: Fog Lights, Atmosphere, and Glows""
Subjects: Electronic books.; Digital art.;
© 2012., Course Technology / Cengage Learning,
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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The Soft Touch : A Photographer's Guide to Manipulating Focus. by Cornfield, Jim.;
Image sharpness is one of photography's yin/yang propositions. Soft focus can impair a photograph, and just as readily enhance itin some cases, greatly enhance it. What we perceive as blur, as soft zones in a picture, function in very much the same manner as deep shadows or overexposed highlights. By minimizing or concealing certain details in the image by selectively throwing areas out of focus at will, the photographer can direct a viewer's attention through the image as he or she intends. Like the rest stops in a piece of music, creatively manipulated zones of softness can totally govern a photograph's overall impact. There are dozens of ways to selectively reduce sharpness in any part of an image, and three important reasons for a photographer to be fluent in his or her ability to create a soft-focus look: (1) to emphasize important picture details by subordinating or eliminating others; (2) to reduce or remove details of a subject that undermine a picture's intent, and (3) to create a mood impression, an aura, that suggests something about a subject that doesn't actually appear in the frame. In this book, Jim Cornfield surveys in detail the art of selectively using soft focus in your photography. Readers will learn about the history of soft-focus photography, then move to technical discussions for creating the effect in-camera (taking advantage of spherical aberrations, circles of confusion, and bokehthe way a lens, due to its unique properties and specific aperture shape, renders image areas that lie outside of the focus rangeoften described as good" or bad" bokeh). Next, readers will move on to a study of post-capture image manipulations using Photoshop and third-party plugins in order to re-create traditional effects. Finally, the author includes an appendix of currently available optical and digital products intended for thecreative application of soft-focus effects. Armed with the tools needed to produce a predictable soft-focus look, readers will be able to expand their photographic repertoire for enhanced artistic expression and stand-out work that will draw clients and generate client referrals.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Composition (Photography);
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Graphic Designer's Essential Reference [electronic resource] : Visual Elements, Techniques, and Layout Strategies for Busy Designers by Samara, Timothy(DLC)1556475;
Cover; Title; Contents; The Designer {Introduction}; How to Use This Book; Basic Techniques; ESSENTIAL VISUAL STRATEGIES; The Basics of Building a Strong Composition; Defining Clear Visual Hierarchy; Symmetry and Asymmetry; Working with Imagery; Using Abstract Form; Creating Visually Dynamic Color Relationships; Using Color to Enhance Messaging; Exploiting Color to Enhance Hierarchy; Limiting (and Maximizing) the Palette; Quick, Easy Coding Strategies; Choosing and Combining Typefaces; Creating Visual Dialogue between Type and Imagery; Crafting Reader-Friendly (and Beautiful!) TextEffectively Using a Column GridGraphic Elements: Image and Style Components of the Designer's Visual Library; PICTORIAL STAPLES: Icons, Abstract Forms, Patterns, and Varied Image Treatments; CHROMATIC CONCEPTS: Color Palettes Organized Visually and by Concept; TYPOGRAPHIC STYLINGS: Typeface Combinations, Treatments, and Embellishments; LAYOUT STRATEGIES: Grid Structures, Cropping Strategies, and Proportion Concepts; Project Strategies: Examples and Explorations to Inspire the Busy Designer; FIRST IMPRESSIONS: Cover Designs, Image-Based Advertisements, and Website Home PagesSETTING THE STAGE: Simple Editorial Spreads, Posters and Advertising Campaigns, and Retail Storefront DisplayTHE HEART OF THE MATTER: Packaging Systems, Content-Rich Websites, and Extended Publication Formats; LETTER-PERFECT: A Selection of Purely Typographic Solutions; Index by Subject; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Directory of Contributors; Acknowledgments
Subjects: Electronic books.; Graphic arts;
© 2011., Rockport Publishers,
On-line resources: CGCC Online Access;
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Notan : the dark-light principle of design / by Bothwell, Dorr(SAGE)1848198; Mayfield, Marlys,1931-(SAGE)1689098;
Notan in everyday life -- Symmetrical and asymmetrical balance -- Negative shapes with positive reversals -- Control of positive and negative space -- Value and the constructive use of tension -- The elements of design -- A compartmented design -- Notan and the innocent eye.
Subjects: Design; Composition (Art);
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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