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Psychology. by Clarke, David.(DLC)1958080;
Cover -- Book title -- Contents -- 1 The Core Studies -- 1.1 The cognitive psychology studies -- Suspects, lies and videotape: an analysis of authentic high-stakes liars -- The formation of false memories -- The reading of the mind in the eyes test (revised version) -- Movement-produced stimulation in the development of visually guided behaviour -- 1.2 The social psychology studies -- Behavioural study of obedience -- A study of prisoners and guards in a simulated prison -- Good Samaritanism: an underground phenomenon? -- Experiments in intergroup discrimination -- 1.3 The developmental psychology studies -- Transmission of aggression through imitation of aggressive models -- Analysis of a phobia of a 5-year-old boy -- Facial diversity and infant preferences for attractive faces -- Factors influencing young children's use of motives and outcomes as moral criteria -- 1.4 The physiological psychology studies -- Cognitive, social and physiological determinants of emotional state -- The relation of eye movements during sleep to dream activity: an objective method for the study of dreaming -- Recalling routes around London: activation of the right hippocampus in taxi drivers -- Olfactory cues modulate facial attractiveness -- 1.5 The individual differences studies -- On being sane in insane places -- A case of multiple personality -- Cognitive style predicts entry into physical sciences and humanities: questionnaire and performance tests of empathy and systemising -- The psychopathology of mirror gazing in body dysmorphic disorder -- 2 Themes in Psychology -- 2.1 Research methods in psychology -- Experiment -- Self-reports -- Correlation -- Observation -- Case study -- 2.2 Methodological issues in psychology -- Ecological validity -- Ethics -- Quantitative and qualitative data -- Reliability -- Sampling -- Snapshot and longitudinal studies -- Validity.2.3 Approaches and perspectives in psychology -- Approaches in psychology -- Perspectives in psychology -- 2.4 Issues and debates in psychology -- Issues in psychology -- Debates in psychology -- 3 AS Examination Guidance/Questions and Answers -- 4 Specialist Choices -- 4.1 Psychology and education -- Perspectives on learning -- Special educational needs -- Learning and teaching styles -- Motivation and educational performance -- Disruptive behaviour in school -- Intelligence -- 4.2 Psychology and health -- The patient-practitioner relationship -- Adherence to medical advice -- Pain -- Stress -- Health promotion -- Health and safety -- 4.3 Psychology and environment -- Noise -- Density and crowding -- Natural disaster and technological catastrophe -- Personal space and territory -- Architecture and behaviour -- Environmental cognition -- 4.4 Psychology and abnormality -- Models of abnormality -- Schizophrenia -- Abnormal affect -- Addiction and impulse control disorders -- Anxiety disorders (phobias) -- Anxiety disorders (obsessions and compulsions) -- 4.5 Psychology and organisations -- The selection of people for work -- Motivation to work -- Leadership and management -- Group behaviour in organisations -- Organisational work conditions -- Satisfaction at work -- 5 A Level Examination Guidance/Questions and Answers.Get your best grades with this Cambridge International A and AS Level Psychology Revision Guide. - Manage your own revision with step-by-step support from experienced examiner David Clarke - Use research summaries and evaluation notes to improve your knowledge of key theories and studies, including coverage of the five specialist choice options - Get the top marks by demonstrating your understanding of the research methods psychologists use Use the Revision Guide to prepare for the big day: - Plan and pace your revision with the revision planner - Use the expert tips to clarify key points - Avoid making typical mistakes with expert advice - Test yourself with end-of-topic questions and answers and tick off each topic as you complete it - Practise your exam skills with exam-style questions and answers This title has not been through the Cambridge endorsement process.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Education.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access.;
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All in the Mind : Psychology for the Curious. by Furnham, Adrian.(DLC)1699095; Tsivrikos, Dimitrios.;
Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Chapter Descriptions -- Preface to the Third Edition -- Acknowledgments -- Some Quirky Quotes About Psychology -- Chapter 1 Introduction: Public Beliefs About Psychology -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Public Ignorance About Psychology -- 1.3 Tackling Student Skepticism About Psychology -- Myth 1: Psychology is merely common sense -- Myth 2: Psychology is not a real science -- Myth 3: Psychology is not useful to society -- Myth 4: Psychologists and psychotherapists are the same -- Myth 5: Psychology is pretty useless - it cannot make good predictions -- Myth 6: Psychology is pretty useless - everyone is unique, so how can it predict behavior? -- General teaching tip -- 1.4 Psychology and Control -- 1.5 How People Get Tricked -- How to be believable -- How to limit and thwart the controls -- How to perform seeming miracles -- What to do in case something goes wrong -- How to distort memories -- 1.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 2 "Untangling" Myths and Psychological Realities -- 2.1 Popular Myths -- 2.2 Mind and Brain Myths -- The brain -- Body energy -- Brain boosters -- 2.3 Myths about Happiness -- 2.4 Modern Myths of Popular Psychology -- 50 great myths and why they are false -- Myths about interpersonal behavior -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 3 The Names and Dates That Shaped Psychology's History and Development -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The Psychology Thinkers and Their Ideas -- Behaviorists -- Developmentalists -- Cognitivists -- Emotion psychology -- Social psychologists -- The computationalists on intelligence -- The biopsychologists -- The perception psychologists -- The personologists -- The psychoanalysts and therapists -- The psychopathologists -- 3.3 Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Science, Pseudo-Science, and Conspiracy Theories -- 4.1 Introduction.4.2 Maxims for Distinguishing Science From Non-Science -- Becoming a psychic or a fortune teller: 13 secrets -- 4.3 Superstition vs. Science -- 4.4 Common Sense -- 4.5 Beware the Fortune Cookie -- 4.6 Conspiracies and Cover-Ups -- 4.7 Conclusion -- Chapter 5 The Man Called Freud -- 5.1 Knowledge of Psychoanalysis -- 5.2 Quizzes -- 5.3 The Basics -- 5.4 The Dynamics of Personality -- 5.5 The Structure of Personality -- 5.6 The Development of Personality -- The Oedipus quiz (Osborne 1993) -- 5.7 Dreaming -- 5.8 Critiques -- 5.9 Freud and Falsifiability -- 5.10 Freud Today -- Chapter 6 A Guide Into Abnormal Psychology -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Being Sane in an Insane Place -- 6.3 Mental Illnesses -- Schizophrenia -- Psychopathy -- 6.4 How Good Are You? -- 6.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 7 Psychology and Work -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Management and Common Sense -- 7.3 Psychologists as Business Consultants -- Diagnostic -- Measurement -- Instruction -- Process -- Systems -- 7.4 The Hawthorne Effect -- 7.5 Money, Motivation, and Happiness -- 7.6 Stress at Work -- Theories and models -- Three components -- 7.7 Conclusion -- Chapter 8 Do Looks Matter? -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Defining Attractiveness -- 8.3 Are Attractive People More Intelligent? -- Unfair, stereotypic, and warranting intervention -- An evolutionary fact and reality -- An association that develops -- 8.4 Why do we Find Particular Physical Characteristics Attractive? -- 8.5 What Are the Key Factors? -- 1. The waist-to-hip ratio -- 2. Body weight -- 3. Temporal and situational factors -- 4. Individual differences -- 5. Proximity and similarity -- 8.6 Physical Characteristics and Personality -- 8.7 Attractive Personalities -- Extraversion -- Neuroticism -- Openness -- Agreeableness -- Conscientiousness -- 8.8 Attractiveness at Work -- Beauty: general attractiveness.Facial attractiveness and confidence -- Hair color -- Weight -- Height -- Intelligence -- Masculinity -- Weight-based discrimination -- Monetary advantages -- Recruitment advantages -- Promotional advantages -- Sales advantages -- 8.9 Conclusion -- Chapter 9 Judging and Nudging -- 9.1 Introduction -- Cognitive dissonance -- 9.2 Cognitive Biases -- 1. Social influence and groups -- 2. Framing -- 3. Number and probability -- 4. Change -- 5. Why do we keep making excuses? -- 6. Don't be a superstitious pigeon -- 7. Illusion or delusion? -- 8. Procrastination -- 9. Knowledge -- 10. Emotion and affection -- 9.3 Behavioral Economics -- 9.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 10 A Psychologist in the Marketplace -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Consumer as an Individual -- 10.3 Children and Advertising -- 10.4 Vulnerability -- Comprehension vulnerability -- Financial vulnerability -- Assertiveness vulnerability -- 10.5 Consumer Decision Making -- Reciprocity -- Commitment and consistency -- 10.6 The Social Consumer -- 10.7 Services and Products -- Brand identity -- Does sex sell? -- 10.8 Ethics and Consumer Well‐Being -- Consumer well-being -- Health risk perception -- Self-image issues -- Consumer activism -- 10.9 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Index -- EULA.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Psychology.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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The Handy Psychology Answer Book : by Cohen, Lisa.;
Front Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- About the Author -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Photo Sources -- Introduction -- INTRODUCING PSYCHOLOGY -- The Basics -- Psychology Before Psychology -- Psychology in Other Cultures -- History and Pioneers -- Sigmund Freud -- John B. Watson and B.F. Skinner -- Jean Piaget -- MAJOR MOVEMENTS IN PSYCHOLOGY -- Behaviorism -- Gestalt Psychology -- Psychoanalytic Theory -- Jungian Analytical Psychology -- Humanistic Theories -- Attachment Theory -- Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology -- Neurobiological Theories -- Cognitive Science -- Psychology as a Science -- Psychological Tests -- Intelligence Testing -- THE BRAIN: ANATOMY AND DEVELOPMENT -- Basic Concepts in Neuroscience -- The Major Structures of the Brain -- Brain Development -- Neurotransmitters and Other Brain Chemicals -- Impact of Environment on the Brain -- FROM BRAIN TO MIND -- The Brain as Mapmaker -- Sensation and Perception -- Motor Behavior and Intentional Action -- Cognition and Behavioral Control -- Emotions -- Emotion and the Limbic System -- Frontal Control of the Limbic System -- Emotions in Mammals -- Charles Darwin's Study of Emotional Expressions -- Jaak Panksepp and Seven Basic Emotional Systems -- PSYCHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN -- Freud's Psychosexual Stages -- Erik Erikson's Psychosocial Stages -- Margaret Mahler -- Jean Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development -- Kohlberg's Stages of Moral Development -- The Role of Culture -- Infancy -- Toddler Years -- Preschool Years (3-5) -- School Age Children (6-11) -- Adolescence (12-18) -- Early Adulthood (19-40) -- Middle Adulthood (40-60) -- Later Adulthood (60 and Older) -- The End of Life: Death and Dying -- THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE: LOVE, MARRIAGE, BABY CARRIAGE -- Love -- Marriage -- The Changing Face of Marriage -- Pregnancy.Parenting: Becoming a Parent -- Parenting: The Work of Raising a Child -- Family Structure -- Family Dynamics -- Divorce -- Sexuality -- Sexual Orientation -- THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE: MOTIVATION AND THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS -- The Psychology of Happiness -- Positive Psychology -- Optimism -- Happiness across Cultures -- The Psychology of Money -- The Biology of Money -- GROUP DYNAMICS AND THE PUBLIC SPHERE -- Group Dynamics -- Prejudice and Racism -- Morality -- Psychology in the Workplace -- Psychology in the Public Sphere -- Voting Behavior -- ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY: MENTAL HEALTH AND MENTAL ILLNESS -- Definitions and Classifications -- Major Mental Illnesses -- Disorders of Personality -- Substance Abuse -- Psychotherapy -- Psychopharmacology -- Popular Psychology -- THE PSYCHOLOGY OF TRAUMA -- The Psychological Impact of Trauma -- Child Abuse -- Sexual Abuse -- Domestic Violence -- FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY -- The Psychology of Criminal Behavior -- Causes of Antisocial Traits -- Specific Forms of Crimes -- Mental Illness and the Law -- Cognition and the Law -- FURTHER READING -- Back Cover.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2016. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Psychology.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Evidence-Based CBT for Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents : A Competencies Based Approach. by Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Rapee, Ronald M.(DLC)1834064;
Evidence-Based CBT for Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents -- Copyright -- Contents -- Notes on Editors -- Notes on Contributors -- 1 An Introduction to the Competencies-Based Approach -- The Genesis of This Book -- Empirically supported treatment, evidence-based practice, and the real world -- The competencies-based approach -- A model of therapist competencies for the evidence-based treatment of child and adolescent anxiety and depressive disorders -- Sburlati et al. (2011) domains of competenc -- About This Book -- Aims -- Book structure -- Chapter structure -- Conclusion -- References -- 2 Effective Training Methods -- Introduction -- Key Features of Training: Presenting Training Material Using Effective Strategies -- Training Approaches for Treating Anxiety and Depressive Disorders -- Training Therapists of Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Training Therapists and Potential Solutions -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Part I Generic Therapeutic Competencies -- 3 Self-Assessment of Our Competence as Therapists -- Introduction -- Key Features of Self-Assessment and Professional Development Competencies -- Definition of self-assessment -- Methods of self-assessment -- Competence in Self-Assessment when Treating Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Competence in Self-Assessment of Skills when Treating Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Self-Assessment and Professional Development Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Monitoring client progress and gaining client feedback -- Recording therapy sessions -- Accessing supervision -- Accessing training -- Conclusion -- References -- 4 Professional Evidence-Based Practice with Children and Adolescents -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Attitudes and ability to utilize research.Operating within professional, ethical, and legal codes -- Supervision/consultation -- Competence in Treating the Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Obstacles to favorable attitudes toward EBPs -- Obstacles to professional practice -- Obstacles to consultation -- Conclusion -- References -- 5 Child and Adolescent Characteristics that Impact on Therapy -- Introduction -- Internalizing Psychopathology in Young People -- Presentation in youth -- Comorbidity -- Developmental Issues -- Individual Differences -- Ethnicity -- Learning disorders -- Environmental Factors and Life Events -- Environmental factors -- Life events -- Conclusion -- References -- 6 Building a Positive Therapeutic Relationship with the Child or Adolescent and Parent -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Alliance building -- Instilling hope and optimism for change -- Competence in Treating Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Anxiety -- Depression -- Competence in Treating both Children and Adolescents -- Children -- Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Discrepancies between children and parents -- Low motivation -- Treatment expectations -- Treatment credibility/acceptability -- Alliance ruptures -- Issues Related to Training and Supervision -- A Final Note on the Use of Assessment Tools to Inform Training and Treatment -- Processes assessed at pre-treatment -- Processes assessed during treatment -- Conclusion -- References -- 7 Assessing Child and Adolescent Internalizing Disorders -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies in Assessing Children and Adolescents -- An evidence-based multi-method, multi-informant psychological assessment of the disorder presentation.Integrating different sources of data -- Consideration of differential diagnosis -- Assessment of current functioning, family functioning, peer relationships, developmental history and stage, and suitability for the intervention -- Assessing the risk of self-harm and suicide -- Competence in Assessing the Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Common Obstacles to Competent Assessment -- Parent and child disagreement -- Developmentally sensitive pitch -- Conclusion -- References -- Part II CBT Competencies -- 8 Theoretical Foundations of CBT for Anxious and Depressed Youth -- Introduction -- The Cognitive Behavioral Theoretical Framework -- Maintaining Factors in Childhood and Adolescent Depression -- Family factors -- Cognitive factors -- Behavioral factors -- Environmental factors -- An Integrated Model of Youth Depression -- Clinical Implications -- Maintaining Factors in Child and Adolescent Anxiety -- Internal factors -- Family and environmental factors -- An Integrated Model of Anxiety in Young People -- Clinical Implications -- References -- 9 Case Formulation and Treatment Planning for Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents -- Introduction -- Devising a Case Formulation and a Treatment Plan -- Theoretically driven, context-aware case formulation -- Dynamic Treatment Planning -- Selecting specific CBT techniques -- Sequencing selected specific CBT techniques -- Dosage of techniques -- Communicating and Negotiating with Children, Adolescents, and Parents -- Initiating treatment through effective communication -- Setting Treatment Goals -- Progress, Obstacles, and Termination during Treatment -- The role of assessment during treatment -- Managing obstacles during treatment -- Ending Therapy and Fostering Maintenance of Gains -- Conclusion -- References.10 Effectively Engaging and Collaborating with Children and Adolescents in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Sessions -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies and Behavioral Markers -- Ability to collaboratively set and adhere to the session goals or agenda -- Ability to communicate the rationale for each specific CBT technique -- Ability to elicit and respond to feedback -- Ability to facilitate in-session collaboration -- Ability to implement specific CBT techniques flexibly -- Ability to make use of experiential strategies -- Ability to end sessions in a planned manner -- Competence in Treating Specific Disorders -- Developmental Considerations: Competence in Treating Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Conclusion -- References -- 11 Facilitating Homework and Generalization of Skills to the Real World -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Competence in Treating Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Youth -- Developmental Considerations: Competence in Treating Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Conclusion -- References -- Part III Specific CBT Techniques -- 12 Managing Negative Thoughts, Part 1: Cognitive Restructuring and Behavioral Experiments -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Cognitive restructuring -- Behavioral experiments -- Competence in Treating Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Competence in Treating both Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Conclusion -- References -- 13 Managing Negative Thoughts, Part 2: Positive Imagery, Self-Talk, Thought Stopping, and Thought Acceptance -- Introduction -- Positive Imagery -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents.Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Self-Talk -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating the anxiety disorders and depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Thought Stopping -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating anxiety disorders and depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Thought Acceptance -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating anxiety disorders and depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 14 Changing Maladaptive Behaviors, Part 1: Exposure and Response Prevention -- Introduction -- Key Features of the Competencies : Behavioral Markers of Competently Delivering Exposure Therapy -- Functional analysis -- Fear hierarchy -- Psycho-education and building motivation -- Variations on a Theme: Competent Exposure in the Context of Different Anxiety Disorders -- In vivo or situational exposure -- Interoceptive exposures -- Imaginal exposure -- Narrative exposure -- Exposure with response prevention -- Developmental Considerations in Providing Competent Exposure Therapy to Children and Adolescents -- SUDs ratings -- Adjusting parent involvement -- Choosing developmentally appropriate exposure tasks -- Common Obstacles to Competently Delivering Exposure Therapy to Children and Adolescents -- "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step": Getting started -- Leaving the comfort zone: Getting out of the office -- Pacing yourself -- Sticking with the game plan -- Become a fearless leader -- References.15 Changing Maladaptive Behaviors, Part 2: The Use of Behavioral Activation and Pleasant Events Scheduling with Depressed Children and Adolescents.Evidence-Based CBT is the first book to take an explicitly competencies-based approach to the cognitive-behavioural treatment of anxiety and depression in children and young people. It draws on top-name expertise to define and demonstrate the therapist competencies needed to effectively implement CBT.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; PSYCHOLOGY / Clinical Psychology.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
unAPI

Evidence-Based CBT for Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents : A Competencies Based Approach. by Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Rapee, Ronald M.(DLC)1834064;
Intro -- Evidence-Based CBT for Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents -- Copyright -- Contents -- Notes on Editors -- Notes on Contributors -- 1 An Introduction to the Competencies-Based Approach -- The Genesis of This Book -- Empirically supported treatment, evidence-based practice, and the real world -- The competencies-based approach -- A model of therapist competencies for the evidence-based treatment of child and adolescent anxiety and depressive disorders -- Sburlati et al. (2011) domains of competenc -- About This Book -- Aims -- Book structure -- Chapter structure -- Conclusion -- References -- 2 Effective Training Methods -- Introduction -- Key Features of Training: Presenting Training Material Using Effective Strategies -- Training Approaches for Treating Anxiety and Depressive Disorders -- Training Therapists of Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Training Therapists and Potential Solutions -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Part I Generic Therapeutic Competencies -- 3 Self-Assessment of Our Competence as Therapists -- Introduction -- Key Features of Self-Assessment and Professional Development Competencies -- Definition of self-assessment -- Methods of self-assessment -- Competence in Self-Assessment when Treating Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Competence in Self-Assessment of Skills when Treating Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Self-Assessment and Professional Development Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Monitoring client progress and gaining client feedback -- Recording therapy sessions -- Accessing supervision -- Accessing training -- Conclusion -- References -- 4 Professional Evidence-Based Practice with Children and Adolescents -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Attitudes and ability to utilize research.Operating within professional, ethical, and legal codes -- Supervision/consultation -- Competence in Treating the Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Obstacles to favorable attitudes toward EBPs -- Obstacles to professional practice -- Obstacles to consultation -- Conclusion -- References -- 5 Child and Adolescent Characteristics that Impact on Therapy -- Introduction -- Internalizing Psychopathology in Young People -- Presentation in youth -- Comorbidity -- Developmental Issues -- Individual Differences -- Ethnicity -- Learning disorders -- Environmental Factors and Life Events -- Environmental factors -- Life events -- Conclusion -- References -- 6 Building a Positive Therapeutic Relationship with the Child or Adolescent and Parent -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Alliance building -- Instilling hope and optimism for change -- Competence in Treating Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Anxiety -- Depression -- Competence in Treating both Children and Adolescents -- Children -- Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Discrepancies between children and parents -- Low motivation -- Treatment expectations -- Treatment credibility/acceptability -- Alliance ruptures -- Issues Related to Training and Supervision -- A Final Note on the Use of Assessment Tools to Inform Training and Treatment -- Processes assessed at pre-treatment -- Processes assessed during treatment -- Conclusion -- References -- 7 Assessing Child and Adolescent Internalizing Disorders -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies in Assessing Children and Adolescents -- An evidence-based multi-method, multi-informant psychological assessment of the disorder presentation.Integrating different sources of data -- Consideration of differential diagnosis -- Assessment of current functioning, family functioning, peer relationships, developmental history and stage, and suitability for the intervention -- Assessing the risk of self-harm and suicide -- Competence in Assessing the Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Common Obstacles to Competent Assessment -- Parent and child disagreement -- Developmentally sensitive pitch -- Conclusion -- References -- Part II CBT Competencies -- 8 Theoretical Foundations of CBT for Anxious and Depressed Youth -- Introduction -- The Cognitive Behavioral Theoretical Framework -- Maintaining Factors in Childhood and Adolescent Depression -- Family factors -- Cognitive factors -- Behavioral factors -- Environmental factors -- An Integrated Model of Youth Depression -- Clinical Implications -- Maintaining Factors in Child and Adolescent Anxiety -- Internal factors -- Family and environmental factors -- An Integrated Model of Anxiety in Young People -- Clinical Implications -- References -- 9 Case Formulation and Treatment Planning for Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents -- Introduction -- Devising a Case Formulation and a Treatment Plan -- Theoretically driven, context-aware case formulation -- Dynamic Treatment Planning -- Selecting specific CBT techniques -- Sequencing selected specific CBT techniques -- Dosage of techniques -- Communicating and Negotiating with Children, Adolescents, and Parents -- Initiating treatment through effective communication -- Setting Treatment Goals -- Progress, Obstacles, and Termination during Treatment -- The role of assessment during treatment -- Managing obstacles during treatment -- Ending Therapy and Fostering Maintenance of Gains -- Conclusion -- References.10 Effectively Engaging and Collaborating with Children and Adolescents in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Sessions -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies and Behavioral Markers -- Ability to collaboratively set and adhere to the session goals or agenda -- Ability to communicate the rationale for each specific CBT technique -- Ability to elicit and respond to feedback -- Ability to facilitate in-session collaboration -- Ability to implement specific CBT techniques flexibly -- Ability to make use of experiential strategies -- Ability to end sessions in a planned manner -- Competence in Treating Specific Disorders -- Developmental Considerations: Competence in Treating Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Conclusion -- References -- 11 Facilitating Homework and Generalization of Skills to the Real World -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Competence in Treating Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Youth -- Developmental Considerations: Competence in Treating Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Conclusion -- References -- Part III Specific CBT Techniques -- 12 Managing Negative Thoughts, Part 1: Cognitive Restructuring and Behavioral Experiments -- Introduction -- Key Features of Competencies -- Cognitive restructuring -- Behavioral experiments -- Competence in Treating Anxiety Disorders and Depression -- Competence in Treating both Children and Adolescents -- Common Obstacles to Competent Practice and Methods to Overcome Them -- Conclusion -- References -- 13 Managing Negative Thoughts, Part 2: Positive Imagery, Self-Talk, Thought Stopping, and Thought Acceptance -- Introduction -- Positive Imagery -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents.Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Self-Talk -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating the anxiety disorders and depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Thought Stopping -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating anxiety disorders and depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Thought Acceptance -- Key features of the competency -- Competence in treating anxiety disorders and depression -- Competence in treating both children and adolescents -- Common obstacles to competent practice and ways to overcome them -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 14 Changing Maladaptive Behaviors, Part 1: Exposure and Response Prevention -- Introduction -- Key Features of the Competencies : Behavioral Markers of Competently Delivering Exposure Therapy -- Functional analysis -- Fear hierarchy -- Psycho-education and building motivation -- Variations on a Theme: Competent Exposure in the Context of Different Anxiety Disorders -- In vivo or situational exposure -- Interoceptive exposures -- Imaginal exposure -- Narrative exposure -- Exposure with response prevention -- Developmental Considerations in Providing Competent Exposure Therapy to Children and Adolescents -- SUDs ratings -- Adjusting parent involvement -- Choosing developmentally appropriate exposure tasks -- Common Obstacles to Competently Delivering Exposure Therapy to Children and Adolescents -- "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step": Getting started -- Leaving the comfort zone: Getting out of the office -- Pacing yourself -- Sticking with the game plan -- Become a fearless leader -- References.15 Changing Maladaptive Behaviors, Part 2: The Use of Behavioral Activation and Pleasant Events Scheduling with Depressed Children and Adolescents.Evidence-Based CBT is the first book to take an explicitly competencies-based approach to the cognitive-behavioural treatment of anxiety and depression in children and young people. It draws on top-name expertise to define and demonstrate the therapist competencies needed to effectively implement CBT.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; PSYCHOLOGY / Clinical Psychology.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access.;
unAPI

Sport Psychology. by Jarvis, Matt.;
Book Cover -- Half-Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- 1 Introduction to sport psychology -- What is sport psychology? -- A brief history of sport psychology -- What is a sport psychologist? -- Further reading -- 2 Personality and sport -- Introduction -- Trait theories -- Eysenck's theory -- Cattell's theory -- Other measurable personality variables -- Sensation seeking -- Telic dominance -- Applying trait and narrow-band theories to sport -- Distinguishing athletes from non-athletes -- Distinguishing successful from unsuccessful athletes -- Personality and choice of sport -- Evaluation of the trait and narrow-band approaches -- Situational and interactional approaches -- Applying the interactional model to sport -- Profiling moods -- Evaluation of the interactional approach -- Social learning theory -- Applying social learning theory to sport -- Patterns of sport-related behaviour -- Athletes as role models -- Acquiring love of sport -- Evaluation of social learning theory -- Summary -- Further reading -- 3 Attitudes to sport -- The nature of attitudes -- The functional approach -- The structural approach -- Applications of the structural approach to sport -- Measuring attitudes -- Likert scales -- Semantic differential scales -- Thurstone scales -- The formation of attitudes to sport -- Personality, genetics and attitudes -- Social learning of attitudes -- Attitudes to competition -- Direct experience and attitudes -- What are children's attitudes to sport? -- Attitudes to sport and sporting behaviour -- Evaluation of the TRA -- Changing people's attitudes to sport -- Cognitive dissonance -- Evaluation of cognitive dissonance theory -- Self-perception theory -- Evaluation of self-perception theory -- Summary -- Further reading -- 4 Aggression in sport -- Defining aggression.Hostile aggression, instrumental aggression and assertiveness -- Sanctioned and unsanctioned aggression -- The link between aggression and performance -- Theories of aggression -- Instinct theories -- Evaluation of the instinct approach -- Social learning theory -- Evaluation of social learning theory -- The frustration-aggression hypothesis -- Evaluation of the frustration-aggression hypothesis -- Conclusions -- Situational factors affecting aggression in sport -- The 64,000 question: does sport increase or reduce aggression? -- Effects on spectators -- The reduction of aggression -- Punishment -- Catharsis -- Role modelling -- Contracting -- Anger-management groups -- Summary -- Further reading -- 5 Arousal, anxiety and stress -- Definitions of arousal, anxiety and stress -- Somatic and cognitive anxiety -- State and trait anxiety -- Factors inducing anxiety and stress -- Situational factors -- Event importance -- Expectations -- Uncertainty -- Individual factors -- Trait anxiety -- Self-esteem and self-efficacy -- The relationship between arousal and performance -- Drive theory -- Evaluation of drive theory -- Inverted U hypothesis -- Evaluation of inverted U hypothesis -- The relationship between anxiety and performance -- The catastrophe model -- Evaluation of the catastrophe model -- Zones of optimal functioning -- Evaluation of the ZOF theory -- Stress management -- Relaxation techniques -- Biofeedback -- Progressive muscle relaxation -- Cognitive-behavioural techniques -- Goal-setting theory -- Evaluation of goal-setting theory -- Imagery techniques -- Mental rehearsal -- Summary -- Further reading -- 6 Social influences on sporting behaviour -- Sources of social influence -- Coaching and socialisation -- Culture and socialisation -- Sport as a socialising agent -- Groups and teams -- Defining groups and teams -- Group formation.Group cohesion -- What determines team cohesion? -- Cohesiveness and performance -- Developing team cohesion -- Social facilitation -- Co-action and audience effects -- Explanations for co-action and audience effects -- Drive theory -- Evaluation of drive theory -- Evaluation-apprehension theory -- Evaluation of evaluation-apprehension theory -- Social loafing -- Groupthink -- Leadership -- Leadership style -- Theories of leadership -- Trait theories -- Evaluation of trait theories -- Fiedler's contingency theory -- Evaluation of Fiedler's theory -- Summary -- Further reading -- 7 Motivation and sport -- Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation -- Humanistic perspectives on motivation -- Maslow's theory of needs -- Evaluation of Maslow's theory -- Achievement-motivation -- The McClelland-Atkinson theory of need achievement -- Evaluation of McClelland and Atkinson's theory -- Fear of success -- Evaluation of FOS theory -- Cognitive approaches to motivation -- Attribution -- Internal and external attributions -- Weiner's model of attribution -- Evaluation of Weiner's model -- Learned helplessness and reattribution training -- Self-efficacy -- Evaluation of the self-efficacy construct -- Contemporary research on motives for sports participation -- Summary -- Further reading -- 8 Skill acquisition -- Skills and abilities -- Definitions -- Classifying abilities -- Evaluation of the ability construct -- Classifying skills -- Gross and fine skills -- Open and closed skills -- Discrete, continuous and serial skills -- External and internally paced skills -- Stages of skill acquisition -- The cognitive stage -- The associative stage -- The autonomous stage -- Evaluation of the three-stage model -- The information-processing approach to skills -- Evaluation of Welford's model -- Memory -- Anderson's model of memory -- Evaluation of Anderson's theory.Theories of motor learning -- Closed loop theory -- Evaluation of closed loop theory -- Schema theory -- Evaluation of schema theory -- Enhancing skill acquisition -- Practice -- Massed and distributed practice -- Whole and part practice -- Physical and mental practice -- Guidance -- Feedback -- Summary -- Further reading -- 9 Study aids -- IMPROVING YOUR ESSAY-WRITING SKILLS -- Practice essay 1 -- Candidate's answer -- Examiner's comments -- Practice essay 2 -- Candidate's answer -- Examiner's comments -- KEY RESEARCH SUMMARY -- Article 1 -- Article notes -- Summary -- Bibliography -- Also available in this series (titles listed by syllabus section):ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENT AND ABNORMAL BEHAVIOURPsychopathologyJohn D.Stirling and Jonathan S.E. HellewellTherapeutic Approaches in PsychologySusan CaveBIO-PSYCHOLOGYCortical FunctionsJohn StirlingThe Physiological Basis of Behaviour: Neural and hormonal processesKevin SilberAwareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and DreamingEvie BentleyCOGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGYMemory and ForgettingJohn HendersonPerception: Theory, development and organisationPaul Ro -- Index.Sport Psychology is an introductory account of the major psychological issues in sport today. Major theories and up-to-date research are covered in the areas of personality, attitudes to sport, aggression in sport, anxiety and stress, social influences, motivation, and skill acquisition. A wide variety of sporting examples are used, ranging from football to ballet.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Athletes -- Psychology.; Electronic books. -- local.; Sports -- Psychological aspects.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Sport Psychology. by Jarvis, Matt.;
Book Cover -- Half-Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- 1 Introduction to sport psychology -- What is sport psychology? -- A brief history of sport psychology -- What is a sport psychologist? -- Further reading -- 2 Personality and sport -- Introduction -- Trait theories -- Eysenck's theory -- Cattell's theory -- Other measurable personality variables -- Sensation seeking -- Telic dominance -- Applying trait and narrow-band theories to sport -- Distinguishing athletes from non-athletes -- Distinguishing successful from unsuccessful athletes -- Personality and choice of sport -- Evaluation of the trait and narrow-band approaches -- Situational and interactional approaches -- Applying the interactional model to sport -- Profiling moods -- Evaluation of the interactional approach -- Social learning theory -- Applying social learning theory to sport -- Patterns of sport-related behaviour -- Athletes as role models -- Acquiring love of sport -- Evaluation of social learning theory -- Summary -- Further reading -- 3 Attitudes to sport -- The nature of attitudes -- The functional approach -- The structural approach -- Applications of the structural approach to sport -- Measuring attitudes -- Likert scales -- Semantic differential scales -- Thurstone scales -- The formation of attitudes to sport -- Personality, genetics and attitudes -- Social learning of attitudes -- Attitudes to competition -- Direct experience and attitudes -- What are children's attitudes to sport? -- Attitudes to sport and sporting behaviour -- Evaluation of the TRA -- Changing people's attitudes to sport -- Cognitive dissonance -- Evaluation of cognitive dissonance theory -- Self-perception theory -- Evaluation of self-perception theory -- Summary -- Further reading -- 4 Aggression in sport -- Defining aggression.Hostile aggression, instrumental aggression and assertiveness -- Sanctioned and unsanctioned aggression -- The link between aggression and performance -- Theories of aggression -- Instinct theories -- Evaluation of the instinct approach -- Social learning theory -- Evaluation of social learning theory -- The frustration-aggression hypothesis -- Evaluation of the frustration-aggression hypothesis -- Conclusions -- Situational factors affecting aggression in sport -- The 64,000 question: does sport increase or reduce aggression? -- Effects on spectators -- The reduction of aggression -- Punishment -- Catharsis -- Role modelling -- Contracting -- Anger-management groups -- Summary -- Further reading -- 5 Arousal, anxiety and stress -- Definitions of arousal, anxiety and stress -- Somatic and cognitive anxiety -- State and trait anxiety -- Factors inducing anxiety and stress -- Situational factors -- Event importance -- Expectations -- Uncertainty -- Individual factors -- Trait anxiety -- Self-esteem and self-efficacy -- The relationship between arousal and performance -- Drive theory -- Evaluation of drive theory -- Inverted U hypothesis -- Evaluation of inverted U hypothesis -- The relationship between anxiety and performance -- The catastrophe model -- Evaluation of the catastrophe model -- Zones of optimal functioning -- Evaluation of the ZOF theory -- Stress management -- Relaxation techniques -- Biofeedback -- Progressive muscle relaxation -- Cognitive-behavioural techniques -- Goal-setting theory -- Evaluation of goal-setting theory -- Imagery techniques -- Mental rehearsal -- Summary -- Further reading -- 6 Social influences on sporting behaviour -- Sources of social influence -- Coaching and socialisation -- Culture and socialisation -- Sport as a socialising agent -- Groups and teams -- Defining groups and teams -- Group formation.Group cohesion -- What determines team cohesion? -- Cohesiveness and performance -- Developing team cohesion -- Social facilitation -- Co-action and audience effects -- Explanations for co-action and audience effects -- Drive theory -- Evaluation of drive theory -- Evaluation-apprehension theory -- Evaluation of evaluation-apprehension theory -- Social loafing -- Groupthink -- Leadership -- Leadership style -- Theories of leadership -- Trait theories -- Evaluation of trait theories -- Fiedler's contingency theory -- Evaluation of Fiedler's theory -- Summary -- Further reading -- 7 Motivation and sport -- Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation -- Humanistic perspectives on motivation -- Maslow's theory of needs -- Evaluation of Maslow's theory -- Achievement-motivation -- The McClelland-Atkinson theory of need achievement -- Evaluation of McClelland and Atkinson's theory -- Fear of success -- Evaluation of FOS theory -- Cognitive approaches to motivation -- Attribution -- Internal and external attributions -- Weiner's model of attribution -- Evaluation of Weiner's model -- Learned helplessness and reattribution training -- Self-efficacy -- Evaluation of the self-efficacy construct -- Contemporary research on motives for sports participation -- Summary -- Further reading -- 8 Skill acquisition -- Skills and abilities -- Definitions -- Classifying abilities -- Evaluation of the ability construct -- Classifying skills -- Gross and fine skills -- Open and closed skills -- Discrete, continuous and serial skills -- External and internally paced skills -- Stages of skill acquisition -- The cognitive stage -- The associative stage -- The autonomous stage -- Evaluation of the three-stage model -- The information-processing approach to skills -- Evaluation of Welford's model -- Memory -- Anderson's model of memory -- Evaluation of Anderson's theory.Theories of motor learning -- Closed loop theory -- Evaluation of closed loop theory -- Schema theory -- Evaluation of schema theory -- Enhancing skill acquisition -- Practice -- Massed and distributed practice -- Whole and part practice -- Physical and mental practice -- Guidance -- Feedback -- Summary -- Further reading -- 9 Study aids -- IMPROVING YOUR ESSAY-WRITING SKILLS -- Practice essay 1 -- Candidate's answer -- Examiner's comments -- Practice essay 2 -- Candidate's answer -- Examiner's comments -- KEY RESEARCH SUMMARY -- Article 1 -- Article notes -- Summary -- Bibliography -- Also available in this series (titles listed by syllabus section):ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENT AND ABNORMAL BEHAVIOURPsychopathologyJohn D.Stirling and Jonathan S.E. HellewellTherapeutic Approaches in PsychologySusan CaveBIO-PSYCHOLOGYCortical FunctionsJohn StirlingThe Physiological Basis of Behaviour: Neural and hormonal processesKevin SilberAwareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and DreamingEvie BentleyCOGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGYMemory and ForgettingJohn HendersonPerception: Theory, development and organisationPaul Ro -- Index.Sport Psychology is an introductory account of the major psychological issues in sport today. Major theories and up-to-date research are covered in the areas of personality, attitudes to sport, aggression in sport, anxiety and stress, social influences, motivation, and skill acquisition. A wide variety of sporting examples are used, ranging from football to ballet.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Athletes -- Psychology.; Electronic books. -- local.; Sports -- Psychological aspects.;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Studying Babies and Toddlers : Relationships in Cultural Contexts. by Li, Liang.; Quiñones, Gloria.; Ridgway, Avis.;
Contents -- List of Contributors -- About the Authors -- About the Editors -- Chapter 1: A Wholeness Approach to Babies' and Toddlers' Learning and Development -- 1.1 Introduction: Wholeness Approach for Creating Coherence -- 1.2 Valuing Relationships -- 1.3 Dynamic Dialectics -- 1.4 Complex Cultural Worlds -- 1.5 A Wholeness Approach to Study Young Children's Cultural Worlds and Transitions -- 1.5.1 Societal Perspective -- 1.5.1.1 Institutional Perspective -- 1.5.1.2 Individual Perspective -- 1.6 The Babies' Relations to the World -- 1.7 Researching the Babies' World -- 1.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2: Toddler's Relationships: A Matter of Sharing Worlds -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Life-World -- 2.3 Shared Life-Worlds: Worthy to Be Defended -- 2.3.1 Creating Shared Life-Worlds -- 2.3.2 Shared Life-Worlds: Defence and Threats -- 2.4 Shared Life-Worlds: Sympathy -- 2.5 Shared Life-Worlds: Difference and Similarity -- 2.6 Shared Life-Worlds: Part of Young Children's Very Existence -- References -- Chapter 3: The Babies' Perspective: Emotional Experience of Their Creative Acts -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Perezhivanie: The Babies' Emotional Experience -- 3.3 A Dialogue Commentary: Visual Narrative Methodology to Explain Babies' Emotional Experience -- 3.4 Analysis of Case Examples -- 3.4.1 Case Example 1: Luci's Moon Up High -- 3.4.2 Luci's Social Dynamic Music Environment Setting -- 3.4.3 Affective Moments and Relations in 'Moon Up High' -- 3.4.4 The Music Reciprocity -- 3.4.5 Case Example 2: Elvin's 'If You Are Happy…' -- 3.4.6 The Social Environment and Situation of Elvin's Awareness of the Song -- 3.4.7 Affective Movements to the Favourite Song -- 3.4.8 The Art of Reciprocity -- 3.4.9 Case Example 3: Silvana's Drum Dance -- 3.4.10 Silvana's Music and Dance in Daily Life Moments -- 3.4.11 Affective Engagement with the Drum Dance.3.4.12 The Reciprocity of Dance -- 3.5 Discussion -- 3.5.1 Babies' Creative Acts Are Culturally Constructed -- 3.5.2 Babies' Perezhivanie in the Creative Acts -- 3.5.3 Taking Babies' Perspective to Provide Reciprocal Emotional Support During the Transitory Moments of Creative Acts -- 3.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: Spatial Perspective on Everyday Transitions Within a Toddler Group Care Setting -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Henri Lefebvre's Spatial Approach -- 4.3 Ethnographic Fieldwork for the Empirical Case -- 4.4 Circle Time -- 4.5 Lunch Time -- 4.6 Discussion: Constructed and Lived-Through Transitions -- References -- Chapter 5: New Mothers Transitioning to Employment: Impact on Infant Feeding Practices -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Background -- 5.2.1 Infant/Mother Dyad -- 5.2.1.1 Infant Feeding Practices -- 5.2.2 Mother's Transition to Work -- 5.2.3 Infant's Transition to Childcare -- 5.3 The Study -- 5.3.1 Theoretical Framework -- 5.3.2 The Individual as the Focus of Analysis -- 5.3.3 The Interpersonal Focus of Analysis -- 5.3.4 The Cultural-Institutional Focus of Analysis -- 5.3.5 The Research Method and Design -- 5.3.6 Aim -- 5.3.7 Sample -- 5.3.8 Data Generation -- 5.3.9 Data Analysis -- 5.4 Findings -- 5.4.1 Expectations -- 5.4.2 Choices -- 5.4.3 Tensions -- 5.5 Discussion -- 5.6 Implications, Challenges and Limitations -- 5.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: Well-Being of Mothers and Young Children in Contexts of Special Health Care -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 An Ecological Perspective -- 6.3 Research Sample -- 6.4 Method -- 6.5 Findings and Discussion -- 6.5.1 Child's Cultural World with Special Health Issues -- 6.5.2 Well-Being Between Mothers and Young Children with Special Health-Care Needs -- 6.5.3 Quality of Relationships and Social Supports -- 6.5.4 Maternal Employment, Work Experiences and Financial Well-Being.6.6 Limitations -- 6.7 Implications of Findings for Future Research -- 6.8 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: Family Child/Day Care Homes as a Cultural Context or World for Babies and Toddlers -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Eco-Cultural Theory -- 7.3 The Research Projects -- 7.4 Themes: Cultural Models and Ideas About Children's Ages -- 7.4.1 Cultural Models -- 7.4.2 Children's Ages and Cultural Models -- 7.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8: Intergenerational Conflicts and Transmission of Values in Raising 0-2-Year-Old Chinese Babies -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Theoretical Framework -- 8.3 Research Design -- 8.3.1 Method -- 8.3.2 Participants -- 8.3.3 Data Analysis -- 8.4 Findings -- 8.4.1 Cooperating with Each Other: Grandparents Respect Parents' Authority -- 8.4.2 Parents Hold the Authority: Parents Stand at the Family Core, While Grandparents Give Up Their Voice -- 8.4.3 Compete for Raising Authority: Parents Stand at the Family Core and Grandparents Seeking Family Voice -- 8.4.4 Avoid Baby-Raising Responsibility: Grandparents Live Independently and Refuse to Take Raising Responsibility -- 8.4.5 Grandparents Hold the Authority: Grandparents Stand at the Family Core and Parents Live in Grandparents' Home -- 8.5 Discussion -- 8.5.1 The Person Holding Authority Has the Power to Define the Boundaries and Identity Standards of Different Role Identities in the Intergenerational Conflicts over Baby-­Raising Strategies -- 8.5.2 Social Structure Influences the Status and Authority of the Two Generations in Family -- 8.5.3 The Inequality in Transmission of Values -- 8.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: The 'Work of the Eye' in Infant Research: A Visual Encounter -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 The Rapid Rise of Visuality -- 9.3 The Invisibility of the Visual in Infant Research -- 9.4 Invoking the Eye(s).9.5 Encountering the 'I' Subjectivities as an Effort of Trying -- 9.6 Analysing Language and Its Meanings -- 9.7 The Language of the Eye -- 9.8 A Concluding Proposition for Infant Research (and Practice) -- References -- Chapter 10: Examining the Dynamics of Infant Reciprocity and Affective Fatherhood -- 10.1 Introduction: Dynamics of Interaction -- 10.2 Building a Fence: Jorge and Silvana, Case Example 1 -- 10.2.1 Visual Narrative -- 10.2.2 Dialogue Commentary -- 10.3 Elvin's Kitchen Play with Dad: Case Example 2 -- 10.3.1 Visual Narrative -- 10.3.2 Dialogue Commentary -- 10.4 Playing with Sound: 'Hi Luci', Case Example 3 -- 10.4.1 Visual Narrative -- 10.4.2 Dialogue Commentary -- 10.5 Discussion: Examining the Dynamics of Infant Reciprocity -- 10.5.1 Balancing Playful Intentions -- 10.5.2 Cultural Learning Through Reciprocity -- 10.5.3 Dynamic Relationships -- 10.6 Conclusion -- 10.6.1 A Relational Ontology -- References -- Chapter 11: Applying the Tavistock Method of Observation and Group Reflection to the Study of Babies and Toddlers in Centre-Based Childcare -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Key Theoretical Concepts Underpinning the Tavistock Method -- 11.2.1 Countertransference -- 11.2.2 Projective Identification -- 11.2.3 Container/Contained -- 11.3 Applying the Tavistock Observation Method to Childcare Settings -- 11.4 Case Study 1: Tuan Aged 18 Months - Countertransference -- 11.4.1 First Observation -- 11.4.2 Seminar Discussion: My Introduction to Countertransference -- 11.4.3 Second Observation -- 11.4.4 Third Observation -- 11.5 Case Study 2: Estelle Aged 42 Months - Projective Identification -- 11.5.1 First Observation -- 11.5.2 Seminar Discussion. How Projective Identification Was Experienced -- 11.5.3 Observation 2 -- 11.5.4 Observation 3 -- 11.6 Case Study 3: Donald Aged 12 Months - Container/Contained -- 11.6.1 First Observation.11.6.2 Second Observation -- 11.6.3 Third Observation -- 11.6.4 Post-observation -- 11.6.5 Seminar Discussion: How Containment Was Experienced -- 11.6.6 Final Observation -- 11.7 Commentary -- 11.8 Concluding Thoughts -- References -- Chapter 12: Transitory Moments as "Affective Moments of Action" in Toddler Play -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Cultural-Historical Theory -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.4 Research Context -- 12.5 Case Example -- 12.6 Discussion -- 12.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: Relations of Dynamic Aspects of Motives in Infant-Toddler's Play: Enhance Small Science Learning Experience -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Cultural-Historical Theorisation of Motives in Play and Learning -- 13.3 Study Design -- 13.3.1 Data Collection -- 13.3.2 Data Analysis -- 13.4 Findings -- 13.4.1 Background of the Play Settings -- 13.4.2 The Vignette: Explore Sound Concepts Through Multiple Toys -- 13.4.2.1 Part One: Explore Tiger's Roar Sound -- 13.4.2.2 Interpretation of Part One -- 13.4.3 Part Two: Explore Whistle's Sound, Rattle's Sound and Drum's Sound -- 13.4.3.1 Interpretation of Part Two -- 13.5 Discussions -- 13.5.1 Cultural Relations: Dynamic Aspects of Motives in Play -- 13.5.1.1 The Collective Play Situation as an Activity Setting - Development of Play Motives -- 13.5.1.2 Family as an Institution Creates the Relations to Motivate the Child -- 13.5.1.3 Culture of Family Play as a Societal Demand -- 13.5.1.4 Human Biology as Primary Motives -- 13.5.1.5 Relations with People Motivate the Child -- 13.5.1.6 Small Science Learning Through Dynamic Aspects of Play Motives -- 13.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14: Emotional Security and Play Engagement of Young Children in Dutch Child Centres: A Story of Explorative Research, Experiments and Educators Testing Hypotheses -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Emotional Security in Group Settings.14.3 Exploration of Quantitative Relationships.Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Developmental psychology;
On-line resources: CGCC online access;
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Punished by rewards : the trouble with gold stars, incentive plans, A's, praise, and other bribes / by Kohn, Alfie(SAGE)1787443;
Includes bibliographical references (p. 352-384) and index.Skinner-Boxed: The legacy of behaviorism -- Is it right to reward? -- Is it effective to reward? -- The trouble with carrots: Four reasons rewards fail -- Cutting the interest rate: The fifth reason rewards fail -- The praise problem -- Pay for performance: Why behaviorism doesn't work in the workplace -- Lures for learning: Why behaviorism doesn't work in the classroom -- Bribes for behaving: Why behaviorism doesn't help children become good people -- Thank God it's Monday: The roots of motivation in the workplace -- Hooked on learning: The roots of motivation in the classroom -- Good kids without goodies.
Subjects: Reward (Psychology); Motivation (Psychology); Behaviorism (Psychology);
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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The Genius in Every Child [electronic resource (video)] : Elementary / by Armstrong, Thomas(SAGE)1768563; Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm)(SAGE)1984150; Films Media Group.(SAGE)1996584; National Professional Resource;
Purpose of EducationThis classic video is an outstanding resource for elementary educators that shows them how to nourish and develop the genius in very young children. Based upon his best-selling book, "Awakening Genius in the Classroom" (published by ASCD), this video features Dr. Thomas Armstrong as he explores the history associated with genius, and debunks the narrow but widely held belief that genius is solely a function of performing well above average in tasks that require academic skills. Armstrong argues that there is genius in every child, which parents and teachers need to discover and awaken. He identifies negative environmental influences that often prevent the genius from revealing itself in children, and discusses factors that awaken and nurture genius, and enhance its growth and development.Viewers will observe Dr. Armstrong's theory being put into practice in schools, and in particular how the Montessori approach nurtures the genius in young children. The executive director of Association Montessori International/USA helps to profile schools that take a creative and unconventional approach to developing students' gifts and raising student achievement and performance, and shares easily implemented strategies with viewers.12 & up.Mode of access: Internet.System requirements: FOD playback platform.Title from distributor's description.
Subjects: Educational films.; Internet videos.; Videorecording.; Cognitive styles.; Education, Elementary.; Motivation (Psychology) in children.; Motivation in education.;
© [2014], c2002., Films Media Group,
On-line resources: http://cgcc-access.sage.eou.edu/login?url=http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?aid=22322&xtid=60344 -- Part of the Films on Demand collection.;
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